'Married… With Children' Plots Animated Reboot With Original Cast - Rolling Stone
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‘Married… With Children’ Could Return as Animated Series With Original Cast

The Bundy family — played by Ed O’Neil, Katey Sagal, Christina Applegate, and David Faustino — is reportedly on board with the reboot

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Katey Sagal, David Faustino, Ed O'Neill and Christina Applegate on 'Married... With Children.'

©20thCentFox/Courtesy Everett Collection

The hit sitcom Married… With Children could return as an animated series with its original cast in tow, Deadline reports. 

The original series, which ran for 11 seasons between 1987 and 1997,  centered around the Bundy family. Ed O’Neil played the patriarch Al — a high school football star-turned-shoe salesman — while Katey Sagal played his wife Peggy, Christina Applegate their daughter Kelly, and David Faustino as their son Bud. 

That core four is reportedly set to reprise their roles in the animated series, which is being written by Family Guy’s current show runner and co-executive producer, Alex Carter. (It’s a fitting pairing considering Family Guy is very much a Married… With Children successor, down to the fact that that both shows featured talking family dogs.) While work on the animated Married… With Children reboot has reportedly been underway for over a year, the show is still being pitched to numerous networks and streaming services. 

And while Married… With Children was never a true ratings behemoth, it was still a major hit for the then-new Fox network and it maintained a sizable audience throughout its seven year run (it even picked up seven Emmy nominations, though all in technical categories like lighting, costuming, and editing). The show also left a definitive mark on pop culture during the late-Eighties and Nineties thanks to its raunchy, boundary-pushing comedy — and the outrage it inspired. 

For instance, a right-wing advocacy group, the Parents Television Council, put the series at Number One on its list of the “Top 10 Least Family Friendly Shows” of 1996 and 1997 (the group railed against its “disgusting brand of ‘family values,’ which included insulting other family members, crude jokes, and bathroom humor”). Even more notoriously, the show was targeted early in its run by the anti-obscenity activist Terry Rakolta, who tried to lead a boycott, but only ended up boosting the show’s profile. 

In an interview with Marc Maron on WTF last year, Sagal even quipped, “We sent [Rakolta] flowers every year. She tried to get us off the air and all it did was get us on the front of The New York Times. And it doubled our audience.”

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