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Golden Globes 2018: 10 Biggest WTF Snubs and Surprises

From ‘Get Out’ getting screwed to some shocking TV show and actor inclusions – our breakdown of today’s nominations

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association dropped their nominations for the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards this morning, shouting out some brand new TV shows and adding some momentum to some of the biggest awards season campaigns – The Shape of Water! Three Billboards! Dunkirk! A few other major players, of course, got left off the lineup in a big way – the Globes have a history of some headslapping choices (remember The Tourist for Best Movie? Cybill for Best TV Comedy?). And while this year seemed a little more on-point than usual, there were a few WTF choices that made us wonder if folks didn’t start pouring those awards-ceremony drinks a little early. Here are the 10 big shockers, snubs – and a few pleasant surprises – from today’s nominations.

All the Money in the World nabs nods Plummer, Williams, and Scott
The campaign for Ridley Scott’s troubled drama about J. Paul Getty – the same one that infamously had an entirely different cast member just a couple months ago (!) and reshoots a few weeks ago (!!!) – has now officially launched. Not only did the director recast Kevin Spacey with Christopher Plummer and get his film done in time, he landed Golden Globe nominations in the process for both of them in the process. The veteran actor wasn’t too much of a surprise given the desire to embrace the effort of a living legend – but Michelle Williams and Scott himself sneaking into competitive categories was kind of a shock. Could All the Money in the World be a film that bypassed the critics groups (because it was still shooting!) but makes waves with the Globes and even the Oscars?

No women nominated for Best Director
Much has been written about the underrepresentation of women in the Best Director categories for the Oscars – but the Globes have never been much better than their awards season partner. In the ceremony’s 75-year history, only five women have been nominated for the award … and two of those were this decade (Kathryn Bigelow & Ava DuVernay). In 2017, the HFPA had a chance to nominate a number of great directors, including Bigelow (Detroit), Dee Rees (Mudbound), Patty Jenkins (Wonder Woman) and, arguably the biggest snub of all, Greta Gerwig, who saw her Lady Bird screenplay and film get nominated … but not her work directing it. Most people are predicting she will get a directing nomination from the Academy. It would have been nice to see it happen here, too.

No Twin Peaks: The Return for Best Limited Series
With Emmy rules being as weird as they are, Twin Peaks: The Return wasn’t eligible there this year – and the Golden Globes love it when they can be the first organization to award a breakout hit. (It’s the explanation for why so many of their nominees are from rookies every year.) There was no show more talked-about this year than David Lynch’s cinematic nightmare, and most people expected it to pop for the Globes. Voters clearly watched the show, too, given they (justly) nominated Kyle MacLachlan for Best Actor, but apparently, however, its Best Limited Series nomination is lost somewhere in the red room, while an evil alternate version roams the Earth. Helloooooooo!

The Big Sick‘s Kumail Nanjiani misses out three times!
With its Comedy/Drama divide, it felt likely that The Big Sick would land a few nominations, including Best Picture and Best Actor, and maybe even Best Screenplay. Nope: It lost out in the Picture category to The Greatest Showman, a musical that most people haven’t even seen yet, and Nanjiani missed the cut for Actor in favor of Steve Carell’s work in Battle of the Sexes, which was a truly uninspired choice. But surely, the movie was a lock for Screenplay, right? Wrong. The comedian’s personal, moving Sundance hit is the kind of film the Golden Globes should have embraced. It makes zero sense that it was completely ignored.

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel & SMILF Getting Big Love
The incredible rate of turnover in Best TV Comedy for the Golden Globes continued this year with only one nomination (Black-ish) remaining the same as 2016. Again, the HFPA loves being first, and they were the first major group to decide that Amazon’s The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Showtime’s SMILF were among the best shows of the year. And they didn’t just pop up in Best TV Comedy; both landed nods for Best Actress as well, for Rachel Brosnahan and Frankie Shaw, respectively. This was one of the more pleasant surprises – both shows could use the push.

Ansel Elgort for Baby Driver?
The baby-faced star of Edgar Wright’s hit action-comedy hasn’t exactly been picking up awards or excessive critical praise for his work. But Elgort scored Baby Driver‘s only nomination at the Globes this year, pushing out folks like Kumail Nanjiani for The Big Sick or Matt Damon for Downsizing in the Best Actor, Comedy or Musical category. The Globes often have to stretch to fill five options in the comedy acting categories (looking at you Johnny Depp and your NINE nominations in the category), but no one predicted they’d stretch all the way to reach the kid with the bitchin’ soundtrack behind the wheel.

Jordan Peele gets neither a Screenplay nor a Director nod
When they announced that Get Out would be considered in Best Comedy/Musical (where it was nominated for Best Picture), did that seal its fate? Jordan Peele, who has been picking up critics awards right and left in both categories, somehow missed out for his debut directorial effort. The Director snub was sadly predictable, given how crowded that category is this year – but given that Get Out is widely considered a frontrunner for Best Original Screenplay at the Oscars, its absence there for the HFPA is startling. And, quite simply, a crime.

No Call Me By Your Name for Best Screenplay or Best Director
Luca Guadagnino’s coming-of-age romance has been considered an Oscar frontrunner all year, and its international pedigree made it feel like a slam-dunk for several Golden Globe nominations. It was nominated for Best Drama but surprisingly missed out in Best Screenplay and Best Director (and only one of its two Best Supporting Actors got a nod instead of the two-fer from some other groups). James Ivory has three nominations in his career for directing but can’t land one here for writing? Come on.

Jason Bateman for Ozark?
Again, the HFPA go for something the Academy couldn’t for the Emmys, but not even the nominee himself likely saw this one coming. With Netflix’s habit of releasing a new series every week, Ozark‘s July debut already feels so far away. Still, the Golden Globes nominated Jason Bateman for his work as a financial advisor who flees Chicago after a drug cartel wants him dead. The actor is a former Globe winner for his work on Arrested Development, but this is his first nomination in the drama categories. Freddie Highmore dropping in the same category for The Good Doctor was a bit surprising too but given that show’s runaway rookie success (it’s the biggest new hit of the fall season for network TV), the Globes had to pay attention.

Katherine Langford for 13 Reasons Why?
Much like Bateman’s work on Ozark, this is just another example of a performance that no one thought an awards group would remember, especially since it premiered way back in March (a lifetime ago for Globes voters). Langford’s work was arguably the best thing about this Netflix hit, and the HFPA loves new talent. But this nomination really shows the broad strength of the streaming service, picking up nominations both expected (The Crown, Stranger Things) and surprising (Ozark, 13 Reasons Why). 

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