Arizona Man Who Learned CPR From ‘The Office’ Saves Woman’s Life – Rolling Stone
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Arizona Man Who Learned CPR From ‘The Office’ Saves Woman’s Life

Despite no CPR training, Cross Scott knew to give chest compressions to the rhythm of Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive,” thanks to Michael Scott

A scene from The Office that dealt with first aid technique is credited with helping to save a life after an Arizona man, despite having no CPR training, managed to resuscitate a woman in medical distress based on what he learned from the NBC comedy series.

In the scene, amid a barrage of bad advice from Steve Carell’s Michael Scott, the first aid trainer recommends to the employees that they perform CPR to the tune of the Bee Gees’ hit “Stayin’ Alive.”

According to the Arizona Daily Star, Cross Scott – who, ironically, shares a last name with the fictional character – found an unconscious woman behind the wheel of her car that was rolling down a dirt pull-off.

After smashing the car window with a rock to gain access to the woman, and with no cellphone on hand, Scott attempted to resuscitate on the woman. “I’ve never prepared myself for CPR in my life,” Scott said. “I had no idea what I was doing.”

Thankfully, Scott had seen the episode of The Office that dealt with CPR training and knew to perform chest compressions to the cadence of “Stayin’ Alive”; the Arizona Daily Star notes that Scott actually sang the Bee Gees track out loud while performing CPR.

Soon after, the woman drew a breath and threw up, at which point Scott rolled her onto her side. Paramedics arrived on the scene 10 minutes later and told Scott that, without his life-saving actions, the situation might have ended more direly. The woman was released from the hospital later that day. Tucson Fire Department wouldn’t release any additional details about the incident.

Courtney Slanaker, executive director of the Red Cross Southern Arizona chapter, told the Daily Star that “if you don’t do CPR, that victim will die. Don’t be afraid to act. Whatever you do will help that victim and hopefully prevent a death,” and confirmed that “Stayin’ Alive” is in fact the correct rhythm for chest compressions.

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