Home TV TV Lists

10 Best TV Shows From 2018 (So Far) That You Should Be Watching

From true-crime procedurals to spinoffs, YA superheroes to social satires – these are the small-screen gems you need to be tuning into

Best 2018 TV Shows You Aren't Watching

The 10 best TV shows from 2018 that you should be watching – from true-crime procedurals and a neglected Netflix treasure to a YA superhero drama.

Yes, we know: It’s impossible these days to keep up with all the great television that keeps piling up on your DVR. But maybe that’s a feature, not a bug. If nothing else, “Peak TV” allows the freedom to zag while everyone else is zigging. Bored by the dreary, over-serious drama that’s drawing raves? Haven’t laughed once at the latest edgy, arty sitcom? In 2018, you’ve got options, including true-crime procedurals, deep-cut superhero dramas, intriguing spinoffs and a some quality shows that aren’t getting the attention, the audience or the accolades that they deserve. Check out what we’re calling “The Great Unwatched”: 10 strong shows from the first half of this year that have yet to command the attention they deserve from the tastemakers. Give them a try and get ahead of the curve.

Play video
5

‘Dietland’

AMC
Veteran TV writer Marti Noxon has worked on the likes of Buffy the
Vampire Slayer
, Mad Men
and UnREAL, but her adaptation of Sarai
Walker’s novel may end up being what she’s best remembered for.
Like the book, the TV series savagely satirizes the weight-loss and
teen fashion magazine industries, via a sprawling and fantastical tale
about an insecure advice columnist (beautifully played by Joy Nash)
caught between two rival feminist cabals. This is Fight Club crossed
with The Devil Wears Prada: witty, heartbreaking and brutal.

Play video
6

‘The Good Fight’

CBS All Access
Picking up where The Good Wife left off, this sequel takes the reliably
gripping, tried-and-true courtroom drama format and uses it to put
contemporary sociopolitical issues on trial. Smart, energetic and
freakishly up-to-date, the scabrous drama’s second season has seen its
underdog Chicago lawyers tackling immigration, sexual harassment, fake
news and even Trump’s alleged “pee tape.” It’s a show about how
we live right now – and about the people trying to make the most of
whatever power’s left in our rickety civic institutions.

Play video
7

‘Grown-ish’

Freeform
On Black-ish, Yara Shahidi’s character Zoey Johnson often comes off as just another aloof millennial, hep to things her
parents will never get. But both the character and the actor who plays her show remarkable range and
depth on this spinoff sitcom about modern college life – one that’s also
refreshingly honest and non-judgmental about everything from “safe
spaces” to students using study-aid drugs. Here’s the perspective on “these kids today” that you need.

Play video
8

‘Howards End’

Starz
Yes, Merchant-Ivory-Jhabvala’s 1992 Oscar-winning film is a classic and damned near impossible to improve. But this four-hour miniseries – adapted
by screenwriter Kenneth Lonergan and director Hettie Macdonald – is
great in its own way, starting with Hayley Atwell’s utterly charming,
empathetic performance the progressive spinster Margaret Shlegel. The TV version includes more
fine detail from E.M. Forster’s 1910 novel; it’s also more ruthless in its
depiction of well-meaning rich folks treating the working-class as
either a novelty or inconvenience. Which, you know, thank god that’s no longer an issue, right?

Play video
9

‘Unsolved: The Murders of Biggie & Tupac’

USA
True-crime docudramas have been arriving in waves ever since the
Emmy-winning success of American Crime Story: The People v. O.J.
Simpson.
 But few are arguably as ambitious as USA’s addition to the fold, which weaves between
three timelines to tell a disturbing story about celebrity, corruption and gangsta-rap beefs. A star-studded cast (which includes
Wendell Pierce, Bokeem Woodbine, Jimmi Simpson and Josh Duhamel)
carries an intricate narrative that explains how talented friends became
bitter enemies, and how two separate LAPD investigations were scotched
before they could reveal troubling secrets.

Play video
10

‘Waco’

Paramount Network 
Formerly known as Spike, the recently rebranded Paramount Network roared
out of the gate earlier this year with this masterfully acted six-hour
miniseries. Taylor Kitsch is the infamous Christian cult leader David
Koresh; Michael Shannon is the conscientious FBI crisis negotiator
trying to keep an armed standoff from becoming a bloodbath. A throwback
to the Seventies/Eighties heyday of the “multi-night TV event,” Waco is an
absorbing, even-handed look at what increasingly seems like a pivotal
moment in the history of American governmental power – and its many forms
of opposition.

Show Comments