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10 Best TV Episodes of 2017

From ‘Better Call Saul’ to ‘Twin Peaks’ – our favorite stand-alone showstoppers from the past year

the handmaid's tale twin peaks better call saul

Rolling Stone picks the 10 best TV episodes of 2017 – from 'Better Call Saul' to 'Twin Peaks.'

Not all TV episodes are created equal, even within top-notch shows – some stand head and recapped shoulder above the pack. This year, we asked writers to essays on the 10 best TV eps of 2017 – from Twin Peaks‘ mind-blowing “Part 8” (“Got a light?”) to Bojack Horseman‘s heartbreaking “Time’s Arrow.” The list is below; you can link to each individual essay within the blurb.

the good place

Colleen Hayes/NBC

‘The Good Place,’ “Dance Dance Resolution”

What was the funniest half-hour of television of 2017? The answer: a clever commentary on the very structure of episodic comedy itself. Forced to reset the Kristen Bell & Co’s bespoke “paradise” lost, Michael (Ted Danson) keeps rewriting the scenario and recasting supporting players in slightly different roles. His victims keep figuring it out. It throws the laughs out fast and furious and then adds in a love story to boot. Come for the high-concept comedy; stay for sense of higher-power comfort. Brian Tallerico
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the handmaid's tale

George Kraychyk/Hulu

‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ “Late”

“Late” offers a gut-wrenching view into what happens to those who don’t conform in Margaret Atwood’s oppressive dystopian future. It’s also when we learn just how near this near future is, rewinding back to Offred (Elisabeth Moss) and her friend Moira (Samira Wiley) participating in a protest that looks an awful lot like the Women’s March. “In a gradually heating bathtub, you’d be boiled to death before you knew it,” Offred says. Viewers awash in the news of the real-world political climate shuddered in recognition. Jenna Scherer
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i love dick

Jessica Brooks/Amazon Prime Video

‘I Love Dick,’ “A Short History of Weird Girls”

You don’t necessarily have to watch the rest of this Amazon series to prep for “A Short History of Weird Girls” – it stands on its own as an inventively exhilarating, abrasively funny 21-minute tour de force. Four women deliver monologues about their sex lives, creative struggles, childhood memories, female desire. Dick doesn’t get a word in – he’s only there as a muse. As always, Kevin Bacon is only there to give the weird girls a reason to cut footloose. Rob Sheffield
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master of none

Netflix

‘Master of None,’ “Thanksgiving”

A coming-out tale told over seven holiday dinners that spans three decades (hurtling through time rather than space), this stand-out, Emmy-winning episode is a vindication of Master of None‘s inclusive vision and artistic aspirations. Lena Waithe (who wrote it) has her character Denise go from a kid discovering she’s gay to a young woman negotiating her her mother’s resistance; Angela Bassett plays her mom. It’s also a reminder that no medium feels more homey than television – a coziness that makes a sense of belonging from the shows we watch all the more important. Inkoo Kang
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twin peaks

Suzanne Tenner/SHOWTIME

‘Twin Peaks,’ “Part 8”

Landing at the exact midpoint of a 16-episode season, Twin Peaks: The Return‘s eighth installment – titled simply “Part 8” – was one of those rare cultural moments when you’ll remember where you were when you watched it. A nuclear bomb explodes in New Mexico, 1945; the story of Laura Palmer and her killer “Bob” appears in an eerie vision of predestination; and when the camera passes through the atomic flame, a photo-negative of American hell awaits on the other side. Then a sooty woodsman asks, “Got a light?” This is what it looks like when Pandora’s Box gets cracked wide open. Scott Tobias
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