Dylan Farrow Talks Woody Allen in First TV Interview: 'I Am Telling the Truth'

"All I can do is speak my truth and hope – hope that somebody will believe me rather than just hearing," she says

Dylan Farrow stood firm in her claims of sexual abuse against her father, director Woody Allen, in her first television interview, set to air Thursday on CBS This Morning.

Now 32, Farrow first accused Allen of sexually assaulting her when she was 7 years old back in 1992, and has been vocal throughout the development of the #MeToo movement and the Time's Up initiative. When asked by CBS This Morning co-host Gayle King what she thought of allegations that she's "trying to bring Woody Allen down," an emotional Farrow became indignant.

"Why shouldn't I want to bring him down?" she asked in a preview clip from the sitdown. "Why shouldn't I be angry? Why shouldn't I be hurt? Why shouldn't I feel some sort of outrage that after all these years of being ignored and disbelieved and tossed aside?"

Farrow added that after being doubted all these years, it's really "on them" to trust that what she is saying, and has been saying, is true.

"All I can do is speak my truth and hope," she said. "Hope that somebody will believe me instead of just hearing."

Allen has repeatedly denied Farrow’s claims of sexual abuse and no criminal charges were ever brought forward.

Earlier this month, Farrow took to Twitter to slam Hollywood for being selective in its support for sexual abuse survivors after the Golden Globes pushed the message that "Time's Up" for sexual misconduct within the industry. (She has also previously called out actresses like Blake Lively and Cate Blanchett for collaborating with Allen while championing the #MeToo movement).

"Advocating for 'every victim' in the abstract is great for illustration," she wrote at the time. "In practice, each victim is a real person with a story that may be inconvenient and require sacrifice to stand with them. If Hollywood isn't prepared to do that, they shouldn’t try to lead this movement."

In the days following Farrow's resurfaced claims, actors like Timothe Chalamet and Rebecca Hall have opted to donate their salaries from their work on Allen's films to different charities, and Lady Bird director Greta Gerwig, who previously balked at questions about her work with Allen, said that she regretted having worked with the director back in 2012.

"I am credible and I am telling the truth and I think it's important that people realize that one victim, one accuser, matters," Farrow said in her CBS This Morning interview. "And that they are enough to change things."