Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon Is an EDM DJ Named 'D-Sol' - Rolling Stone
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There’s Nothing Subprime About These EDM Bangers From the CEO of Goldman Sachs

David Solomon took over as chief executive in October, but he’s been dropping electronic music beats for years

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - OCTOBER 10:  C.E.O. at Goldman Sachs, David Solomon speaks onstage at Day 2 of the Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit 2018 at The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on October 10, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California.  (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)

Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon speaks onstage at Day 2 of the Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit 2018 at The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on October 10, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California.

Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

As the new CEO of Goldman Sachs, David Solomon makes north of $15 million a year. Not bad. Not bad at all. Must be nice to have that kind of dough. But let me ask you something…

Do earnings calls slap?

Can you surrender yourself to the rhythm of a billion-dollar buyout?

With Steve Mnuchin and his transition lenses having left the private sector for the Treasury, is there even anyone left in this mother who knows how to properly turn out a C-suite? You know, like they did back in the Nineties?

No, sadly, one of the world’s pre-eminent investment banks has devolved into an office full of slick-haired squares, which is why as soon as the sun goes down, one can imagine Solomon taking off his suit, donning a pair of headphones and becoming DJ D-Sol.

He’s been on a nice little hot streak, too. In December, D-Sol dropped a new single, “Feel Alive.” Featuring Katt Rockwell on vocals, he notes on Instagram that the sensual banger is his “first original song.” Last week he released a remix by Morgan Page. It might even be better than the original.

Though “Feel Alive” is DJ D-Sol’s first original track, he didn’t get into the game yesterday. Solomon has been spinning for years, mostly in New York, Miami and the Bahamas, according to his Instagram handle, which is closing in on 20,000 followers. Goldman Sachs spokesperson Jake Siewert maintains that Solomon’s side hustle is all part of his work-life balance. “David’s always believed that having a wide range of outside interests leads to a balanced life and makes for a better career,” Siewert told the New York Times in 2017. “He’s preached that regularly to younger employees in the firm and tries to lead by example.”

Considering his salary at Goldman Sachs, Solomon has little use for whatever relatively paltry fees he may pick up for his DJ skills. To show that he’s in it strictly for the love of the drop, Solomon donates all of his DJ-related proceeds to charities fighting the opioid epidemic. Very lit.

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