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Clinton: Rewrite the Rules for Me

I don’t understand why the Clinton campaign acts as though they’re entitled to re-write the ground rules of the campaign, ex-post-facto, to their advantage.

First it was the “unfair” Nevada caucus rules that her surrogates sued — unsuccessfully — to change six days before the election.

Now Clinton is angling to rewrite the rules to re-seat the delegates that Michigan and Florida forfeited by jumping in line in the primary schedule.

If Clinton gets her way, the uncontested beauty contest she took in Michigan would retroactively become a font of free delegates on her behalf. [Obama and Edwards, honoring the spirit of the Democratic party ruling against the state pulled their names from the Michigan ballot; Clinton, parsing the letter of the agreement, saw fit to leave her name on the ballot.]

Clinton also wants Tuesday’s upcoming non-contest in Florida — where the candidates have been barred from campaigning — to seat real delegates. All in the name, she says, of having the voters’ of these two states “voices heard.”

What a load.

If Clinton were to succeed in this gambit, she’d pull in the lion’s share of more than 350 delegates — a hair fewer than California and more than twice the total of the first four sanctioned contests combined — by dint of name recognition (Florida) or default (Michigan).

All without having to give a speech, air an ad, or lift a finger.

It’s like changing the rules in the middle of a basketball game to count the pre-game layup drills in the final score.

UPDATE:

The Clinton campaign is now using its screw-the-rules stance regarding Florida’s delegates to smear the Obama campaign, which they now say wants to “ignore Floridians.”

Clinton communications chief Howard Wolfson:

Regardless of today’s outcome, the race quickly shifts to Florida, where hundreds of thousands of Democrats will turn out to vote on Tuesday.

Despite efforts by the Obama campaign to ignore Floridians, their voices will be heard loud and clear across the country, as the last state to vote before Super Tuesday on February 5th.

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