Megan Thee Stallion, Big Sean Sued for Infringement on 'Go Crazy' - Rolling Stone
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Megan Thee Stallion, Big Sean Sued for ‘Willful’ Infringement on Collaboration ‘Go Crazy’

“The Infringing Work is so strikingly similar to the Copyrighted Work as to preclude the possibility of independent creation,” the new lawsuit filed in district court in New York states

INDIO, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 22: Rapper Big Sean performs onstage in the Sahara Tent during Day 1, Week 2 of Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on April 22, 2022 in Indio, California. (Photo by Scott Dudelson/Getty Images for Coachella)INDIO, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 22: Rapper Big Sean performs onstage in the Sahara Tent during Day 1, Week 2 of Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on April 22, 2022 in Indio, California. (Photo by Scott Dudelson/Getty Images for Coachella)

Rapper Big Sean performs onstage in the Sahara Tent during Day 1, Week 2 of Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on April 22, 2022 in Indio, California.

Scott Dudelson/Getty Images

Megan Thee Stallion and Big Sean have been named as defendants in a new copyright infringement lawsuit that claims the rappers willfully replicated essential portions of a 2012 song titled “Krazy” when creating their collaboration “Go Crazy” for Big Sean’s 2020 debut album Good News. The record, produced by J.R. Rotem, also featured 2 Chainz, though he isn’t named in the suit.

In the complaint filed Monday and obtained by Rolling Stone, Detroit artists Duawn “Go Hard Major” Payne and Harrell “H Matic” James allege that “Go Crazy” features “nearly identical” timing, melodies, harmonies, tones, cadence, reverb, and wording within the chorus as their track “Krazy,” which was published online via YouTube and ReverbNation in addition to the “thousands of copies” distributed in CD format and multiple club performances in Detroit.

“An average lay observer would recognize the Infringing Work as having been appropriated from the Copyrighted Work because of the striking similarity between the two compositions and the way in which they are performed,” reads the complaint. “Indeed, the Infringing Work is so strikingly similar to the Copyrighted Work as to preclude the possibility of independent creation.”

According to the filing — which also names Universal Music Group, 300 Entertainment, and 1501 Certified Entertainment — Payne and James performed their record “Krazy” in popular hip-hop clubs and bars they believe were frequented by Big Sean (real name Sean Michael Leonard Anderson).

“Anderson had further access to the Copyrighted Work given the Copyrighted Work’s number 1 ranking on the Detroit charts at ReverbNation in 2015,” the complaint states. “The sale of thousands of physical copies of CD’s featuring the Copyrighted Work on the streets of West Detroit and the parking lots of hip hop clubs in West Detroit frequented by Anderson provide further access of the Copyrighted Work to Defendants.”

The lawsuit also alleges that Big Sean and Megan Thee Stallion were sent a cease and desist letter that “in good faith, sought to amicably resolve the issue.”

It continues: “Since being placed on notice of their infringing conduct, Defendants have continued their willful and reckless disregard of the exclusive copyrights belonging to Plaintiffs, forcing Plaintiffs to initiate this lawsuit.”

The lawsuit is seeking damages and injunctive relief for copyright infringement in an amount to be established at trial. Reps for Big Sean declined to comment. A rep for Megan Thee Stallion did not immediately respond to Rolling Stone‘s request for comment.

In This Article: Big Sean, Megan Thee Stallion

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