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The 50 Greatest Concerts of the Last 50 Years

From Led Zeppelin’s U.S. debut to Jay Z and Kanye West’s ‘Watch the Throne’ spectacle, and beyond

The list below was born out of some pretty serious arguments. Was Bruce Springsteen better in 1975 or 1978? When did Kanye hit his stride? Which was more awesome, “The Joshua Tree” or “Zoo TV”? The concerts and tours that made the final cut weren’t just huge spectacles, they deepened the power of rock & roll itself – from Neil Young thrashing out 20-minute jams with Crazy Horse to Beyoncé turning stadium glitz into a personal outpouring. “You’re almost levitating on the energy from the audience,” says Keith Richards. “And I miss it when I’m not doing it.” Here are the people who’ve done it best.

Taylor Swift '1989' Tour

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Taylor Swift ‘1989’ Tour

“You’re not going to see me playing the
banjo,” Taylor Swift warned Rolling
Stone
at the outset of her 1989 world tour. On her Speak Now and
Red tours, she claimed her turf at the crossroads of country, pop and
classic arena rock. But for 1989, Swift made her bold move into full-on
dance pop. She turned up the glitz with new material like “New Romantics”
and “Blank Space” (“blatant pop music,” as she put it), but
she didn’t compromise on her trademark emotional overshares, whether opening up
in confessional interludes or torching up ballads (“Clean”). Swift
aimed for a glammier look onstage, reflecting the grown-up flair of the music,
and she invited high-profile guests: In Nashville, she duetted with Mick
Jagger; in L.A., she brought out Beck, St. Vincent, Justin Timberlake, Chris
Rock and Alanis Morissette. It all summed up her staggeringly ambitious vision
of modern pop. Rob Sheffield

Beyoncé Formation Tour

Frank Micelotta/Parkwood Entertainment/Getty

Beyoncé Formation Tour

Strutting in stacked heels across the turf of Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California, wrapped in golden bandoleers and flanked by a Black Panther–styled phalanx of dancers, Beyoncé performed “Formation” at the 2016 Super Bowl in a cameo appearance even fiercer than her 2013 Super Bowl triumph. It was the overture to a tour that redefined stadium-scale concert staging. “She had an overall vision of what she wanted,” says Steve Pamon, chief operating officer of Beyoncé’s label, Parkwood Entertainment. “Not only in terms of a business, but in the type of experience we want to give the fans.”

Four days before the tour began, Beyoncé surprise-dropped her instant classic Lemonade. British