Shania Twain’s 20 Best Songs, Ranked – Rolling Stone
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Shania Twain’s 20 Best Songs, Ranked

From “Life’s About to Get Good” to radio staples like “Man! I Feel Like a Woman!”

Shania Twain

Counting down the 20 best songs of Shania Twain, who released her first new album in 15 years on September 29th.

Courtesy of BB Gun Press

The Shania Twain catalog is rich with radio hits, songs that have come to define an era in country music and paved the way for other genre-bending artists that followed. But there are also some deeper cuts that stand among Twain’s best. While they may not have the pop-culture appeal of monsters like “Man! I Feel Like a Woman!” or “That Don’t Impress Me Much,” they are integral to the Canadian superstar’s fabric. We rank her 20 best tracks in order.

Shania Twain

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7

“Any Man of Mine” (1995)

With a verse that sounded like Def Leppard’s “Let’s Get Rocked” – another Mutt Lange success story – and a chorus dominated by pedal steel guitar, “Any Man of Mine” singlehandedly build the bridge between Twain’s country foundation and her pop/rock makeover. The song arrived in May 1995, hitting the airwaves while “Whose Bed Have Your Boots Been Under?” was still a Top 20 single. The timing was perfect. With an abundance feminist firepower and crossover charm, “Any Man of Mine” went all the way to Number One, priming audiences for the genre-jumping hits to follow. R.C.

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6

“From This Moment On” (1998)

Following up the massive success of “You’re Still the One” was no easy task for Twain, but “From This Moment On” didn’t disappoint — both in terms of sales and artistic statement. Reaching Number Four on the Billboard Hot 100, the song reinforced just how much her appeal had crossed over outside the country world, as it performed better on the pop chart than it did on its country counterpart, even with a cameo from fellow country singer Bryan White. True enough, with its schmaltzy production and sweeping string arrangement, “From This Moment On” was more adult contemporary than country. But that lush, down-tempo approach suited Twain just fine, whose voice simply soared in one of her most stunning performances. The message was clear: It didn’t matter what kind of music Twain was singing so long as she was the one singing it. J.G.

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5

“Whose Bed Have Your Boots Been Under” (1995)

Twain knows her way around a song title, but this one from her 1995 country smash The Woman In Me just may take the cake as her best. The song itself is Nineties country gold, complete with clever wordplay, big vocal harmonies, and plenty of fiddle. Notably, the track was the first single that Twain, who made her debut two years prior with Shania Twain, co-wrote with Mutt Lange, and was also her first single to be certified Gold by the RIAA. While it didn’t do much in the way of foreshadowing Twain’s imminent crossover into pop country superstardom, the song remains one of her most beloved early hits. B.M.

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4

“That Don’t Impress Me Much” (1998)

If there is a better lyric in modern country music than, “Okay, so you’re Brad Pitt? That don’t impress me much,” we’ve yet to find it. Twain delivers the knockout line about two thirds of the way through the 1998 Come On Over smash with the kind of brassy, deadpan confidence that helped make that LP the best-selling country album of all time. The music video for the give-no-fucks anthem is one of Twain’s most beloved, too, featuring her in one of her signature leopard print looks while rejecting the advances of various hunk-types out in the desert. It remains one of Twain’s best-performing songs, having reached Gold or Platinum in nine countries. B.M.

Shania Twain

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3

“If You’re Not in It for Love (I’m Outta Here)” (1995)

Twain had scored her first country Number One with “Any Man of Mine” a few months before “(If You’re Not in It for Love) I’m Outta Here!” went to radio in the fall of 1995, but when it also topped the charts early the next year — the second of four singles to do so from The Woman in Me — it solidified her as a bona-fide hitmaker. The song was a watershed moment stylistically, too, with its crunchy, hard-rock edge, hand-clapping chorus, and, most importantly, the clever self possession of the lyric, in which Twain gleefully shoots down the ham-fisted advances of an oily barfly. Exploiting both her international appeal and potential as a sex symbol, the “I’m Outta Here!” dance remix was the basis of yet another hit music video, and even inspired Berlin dance group Real McCoy to record a cover two years later. J.G.

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2

“Man! I Feel Like a Woman!” (1997)

By the time they released this seventh single off 1997’s Come On Over, it was obvious that the Shania Twain/Mutt Lange team’s ambitions weren’t just arena-sized – no, they wanted the whole danged stadium. And “Man! I Feel Like a Woman!” was just the ticket to put them all the way over the top, a song with enough sly attitude to earn its multiple exclamation points. That signature ear-worm guitar riff sets the tone as it struts out of the speakers, while Shania testifies to the prerogative of dressing up to have a little fun. It’s the rare song that’s even better when seen, with a hilarious video that riffs on Robert Palmer’s iconic “Addicted to Love” clip, surrounding Twain with a backup band of deadpan beefcakes. Even funnier is the Chevrolet truck spot that uses “Man!” for its soundtrack. D.M.

Shania Twain

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1

“You’re Still the One” (1998)

The ultimate Y2K prom theme, “You’re Still the One” was ubiquitous during the late Nineties, when it dominated mainstream radio alongside Celine Dion’s “My Heart Will Go On,” Aerosmith’s “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing” and other crossover power ballads. Twain had written the song with her producer and then-husband Mutt Lange in response to public concerns about the couple’s 16-year age difference and supposedly mismatched marriage. Nearly two decades later, the once-happy partners are no longer together, driven apart by an extramarital affair that influenced much of Twain’s comeback album Now. Even so, the chorus of “You’re Still the One” remains lodged within the auditory cortexes of Millennials, Generation Xers and pretty much anyone else who listened to Top 40 radio during the turn of the century. Look how far we’ve come, my baby. R.C.

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