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Readers Poll: The Best Neil Young Songs

Selections include ‘Cortez The Killer,’ ‘Powderfinger’ and ‘Harvest Moon’

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Last year Neil Young released the stellar Daniel Lanois-produced "Le Noise" and toured it around America. This year he seems to be more focused on looking back. He's on tour right now with Buffalo Springfield, and on the verge of releasing a live album recorded on his country tours of the mid-Eighties – hence our decision to poll our readers and see what their favorite Neil Young songs are.

Unsurprisingly, you're quite keen on his Seventies catalog. We can't blame you: Between 1969's Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere and 1978's Rust Never Sleeps Young reached a level of genius that few songwriters have ever topped. Click through to watch videos of your top 10 tracks. 

By Andy Greene

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1. ‘Old Man’

In 1970 Neil Young bought a giant plot of land in Northern California. He dubbed the place Broken Arrow Ranch and he's lived there to this day. When he moved in, the land was overseen by a man named Louis Avila. "Louis took me for a ride in this blue Jeep," Young said in 2005. "He gets me up there on the top side of the place, and there's this lake up there that fed all the pastures, and he says, 'Well, tell me, how does a young man like yourself have enough money to buy a place like this?' And I said, 'Well, just lucky, Louie, just real lucky.' And he said, 'Well, that's the darndest thing I ever heard.'" Young wrote the song about him. Sidenote: Young is older now than Avila was when they first met. 

RELATED:
The Rebellious Neil Young: Cameron Crowe's 1975 Rolling Stone Interview
Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young Enchant London Audiences in 1970: An Exclusive Excerpt from David Browne's Book
Review: Neil Young and the International Harvesters' A Treasure

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