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Readers’ Poll: The Best Christmas Songs of All Time

Selections include ‘Christmas In Hollis,’ ‘Wonderful Christmastime’ and ‘All I Want For Christmas Is You’

bowie and bing christmas

GAB Archive/Redferns

You can try and avoid it as much as you want, but over the next month you're going to be inundated with Christmas music. It seems like the Christmas Music Industrial Complex grows exponentially bigger every year. Arenas are packed with groups like the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, who actually split into two camps so they can cover more ground in December. Countless artists – from Justin Bieber to Scott Weiland – released Christmas CDs this year. Most Christmas songs are insipid and horrible, but some gems have slipped by over the years. Last week we asked our readers to vote for their favorite Christmas songs. Click though to see the results. 

By Andy Greene

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3. Queen – ‘Thank God It’s Christmas’

Queen released this Christmas single in November of 1984, but it didn't appear on any album and isn't nearly as famous as their many, many hits. They never even made a video for it. That's a shame. It's a beautiful song that stands up to anything in their catalog. They finally put it on an album in 1999 when they released Greatest Hits Volume 3

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2. The Pogues – ‘Fairytale Of New York’

If you live in Ireland or the U.K., odds are this is your favorite Christmas song. If you live in America, odds are you've never heard it. But we urge everyone to give it a spin. You're going to love it. The Celtic Punk band the Pogues released the song in 1987, and it's remained one of their most beloved compositions – despite the use of the word "fa–ot." Back in the 1980s, that word was more acceptable. It's even in "Money For Nothing" by Dire Straits, though when Knopfler plays it now he sings "mother" instead. 

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1. John Lennon – ‘Happy Xmas (War Is Over)’

John Lennon and Yoko Ono wrote "Happy Xmas (War Is Over)" about the war in Vietnam, but it's become one of the most beloved Christmas songs of all time and few people even associate it with the war anymore. Phil Spector produced the song, and he recruited the Harlem Community Choir to join the recording session at the Record Plant in New York. The seed for the song was planted two years earlier when John and Yoko bought billboards all across New York reading "WAR IS OVER! (If You Want It.)" 

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