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Readers’ Poll: The 10 Best Rolling Stones Deep Cuts

These tracks weren’t released as singles, but they remain some of the most memorable tunes in rock history

The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones in London in 1964.

Terry O'Neill/Hulton Archive/Getty

The Rolling Stones tend to center their concerts around their vast catalog of hits, but Mick Jagger tells us that this summer's tour will also highlight some lesser-known tunes from Sticky Fingers. Nothing is confirmed, but it seems quite possible they're going to play "Sister Morphine" and "Moonlight Mile" for the first time since the 1990s. This inspired us to ask our readers to vote on the band's best deep cuts. We counted anything that wasn't a hit. Here are the results. 

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The Rolling Stones in London in 1964.

Terry O'Neill/Hulton Archive/Getty

4

“Dead Flowers”

Just nine days after Altamont, the Rolling Stones headed into London's Olympic Studios to cut this new song with dark overtones quite possibly inspired by the recent tragedy. "I'll be in my basement room/with a needle and a spoon," Jagger sings.  "And another girl to take my pain away." This was right at the time that country rock groups like Poco and the Flying Burrito Brothers were taking off, and their influence is pretty clear. Townes Van Zandt covered the song many years later, and this version was memorably used in The Big Lebowski. 

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The Rolling Stones in London in 1964.

Terry O'Neill/Hulton Archive/Getty

3

“Sway”

Tucked between "Brown Sugar" and "Wild Horses" on Sticky Fingers, "Sway" was the first truly great showcase for Mick Taylor. The guitarist wrote the song with Mick Jagger and believed he'd receive proper acknowledgement, but it was ultimately credited to Jagger/Richards even though Keith merely provided backing vocals. It was the type of indignity that Taylor was willing to put up with in the early days but would increasingly become an issue in later years. The guitarist played the tune with the Stones on three occasions in 2013. 

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The Rolling Stones in London in 1964.

Terry O'Neill/Hulton Archive/Getty

2

“Moonlight Mile”

If the Rolling Stones do go ahead and perform Sticky Fingers this summer, the highlight might wind up being "Moonlight Mile," especially if they splurge for a string section to play the song properly. The six-minute tune wraps up the album with gorgeous arrangement by Paul Buckmaster, who was working similar magic with Elton John at the exact same time, and this elevated the song into an absolute masterpiece. The Stones tried it live in 1999, but it never truly took off.

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The Rolling Stones in London in 1964.

Terry O'Neill/Hulton Archive/Getty

1

“Can’t You Hear Me Knocking”

It's pretty clear that Sticky Fingers is popular album among Stones aficionados – half of this list comes from that album. On "Can't You Hear Me Knocking," Keith Richards melds with new bandmate Mick Taylor perfectly, and the song ends with a jam that sounds like the best piece of music Carlos Santana never recorded. It was captured in a single take and Richards didn't even realize he was being recorded, but the back-and-forth is recreated every time the group plays the song live. The Stones didn't bring "Can't You Hear Me Knocking" out much at the time, but in 2002 it finally entered their regular rotation. 

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