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Readers’ Poll: The 10 Best Post-1990s Radiohead Songs

See what song managed to top “Idioteque,” “All I Need” and “Pyramid Song”

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Radiohead performing in Germany in November 2003.

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When Radiohead fans picked up Kid A at their local record stores on October 2nd, 2000 many of them didn't know what to make of the strange album. The experimental music was a far cry from 1990s guitar-driven tunes like "Paranoid Android" and "The Bends" (not to mention their breakthrough hit "Creep"), and on first play many were disappointed. This was music that took a few listens to sink in and reveal itself. As the decade wore on, Radiohead would continue to challenge their fans, and many of those same fans disappointed by Kid A at first listen are screaming along to every word of "Idioteque" and "The National Anthem" at the group's concerts these days. They've become the old classics. In honor of A Moon Shaped Pool, we asked Radiohead fans to vote for their favorite post-1990s tunes by the band. Here are the results. 

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(GERMANY OUT) S?nger Thom Yorke (GBR/Radiohead) anl?sslich eines Konzertes im Berliner Velodrom (Photo by snapshot-photography/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

4

“Weird Fishes/Arpeggi”

In Rainbows is clearly a remarkably popular album with our readers. Six of the 10 tracks on this list come from that album, compared with a mere two for Kid A and just one for Amnesiac and Hail to the Thief. This one – which first surfaced during a 2005 performance by Thom Yorke, Johnny Greenwood and the Nazareth Orchestra – is about chasing someone to the end of the earth, and then falling into a strange pool of water. "I get eaten by the worms," Yorke sings. "Weird fishes/Get picked over by the worms." 

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(GERMANY OUT) S?nger Thom Yorke (GBR/Radiohead) anl?sslich eines Konzertes im Berliner Velodrom (Photo by snapshot-photography/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

3

“Reckoner”

Of the many In Rainbows songs our readers love, "Reckoner" seems to be their favorite. An extremely early version of the song debuted in Washington state on the 2001 Amnesiac tour, but the song was radically reworked over the next six years so that by the time it appeared on In Rainbows it was almost unrecognizable. It was the final single released from In Rainbows and has been in heavy rotation in their setlist ever since. 

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(GERMANY OUT) S?nger Thom Yorke (GBR/Radiohead) anl?sslich eines Konzertes im Berliner Velodrom (Photo by snapshot-photography/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

2

“How to Disappear Completely”

There's a lot of sad songs in the Radiohead catalog, but none of them can quite compare with "How to Disappear Completely" from Kid A. Nobody in the group has ever talked much about the inspiration, but it clearly came from a very dark place –possibly in Ireland judging by the reference to the River Liffey – which flows through Dublin. It's one of those songs that you can hear 10,000 times, and it still brings everything in your life to a dead stop when it comes on. The group still plays it regularly in concert.

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(GERMANY OUT) S?nger Thom Yorke (GBR/Radiohead) anl?sslich eines Konzertes im Berliner Velodrom (Photo by snapshot-photography/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

1

“There There”

For their 2003 LP Hail to the Thief, Radiohead decided it was time to break out the guitars again and create a slightly more traditional rock album. The first taste anyone got of it was "There There," which came out as a single a few weeks before the album. Subtitled "The Money King of Nowhere," the track was nominated for a Best Rock Performance Grammy, but lost out to Warren Zevon and Bruce Springsteen's "Disorder in the Street." "Seven Nation Army" also lost in the same category, so they were in good company. "There There" did got a lot of radio play all over the globe, and it opened many shows on the Hail To The Thief tour. 

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