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Readers’ Poll: The 10 Best Post-1960s Bob Dylan Songs

See what tune managed to top ‘Hurricane,’ ‘Not Dark Yet’ and ‘Shelter From the Storm’

Bob Dylan and his Rolling Thunder Revue

Bob Dylan performs with his Rolling Thunder Revue in 1975.

Frank Lennon/Getty

People who haven't paid that much attention to Bob Dylan's career often see him as a creature from the 1960s, the folk singer that plugged in and released "Like a Rolling Stone" before settling into a comfortable existence as an oldies act. His many fans know he continued churning out stunningly brilliant songs long after the Seventies began, and even today he remains an extremely vital artist. And as his MusiCares speech proved, he's still rather feisty and has a lot to say. We asked our readers to select their favorite Dylan songs released after the 1960s. Here are the results.

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TORONTO, ON - DECEMBER 2, 1975: His rolling thunder revue making its way toward New York, Bob Dylan (left) last night took centre stage before 16,000 people at Gardens, accompanied by a host of other folk music personalities including Mick Ronson (centre) and Bobby Neuwirth. Joni Mitchell was there, and Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Ronee Blakley and Roger McQuinn and Gordon Lightfoot. Joan Baez joined in duet with Dylan, her dignity filling hall, according to Star writer Peter Goddard.

5

‘Not Dark Yet’

Dylan was just 56 when he recorded Time Out of Mind, but he crammed a lot of living into those years and already felt like an old man facing the inevitably of death. Regret, loss and mortality come up again and again. The starkest song is "Not Dark Yet," a six-and-a-half-minute track that is surely one of the most depressing and moving songs in Dylan's catalog. "I was born here and I'll die here against my will," he sings. "I know it looks like I'm moving, but I'm standing still/Every nerve in my body is so vacant and numb/I can't even remember what it was I came here to get away from."

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TORONTO, ON - DECEMBER 2, 1975: His rolling thunder revue making its way toward New York, Bob Dylan (left) last night took centre stage before 16,000 people at Gardens, accompanied by a host of other folk music personalities including Mick Ronson (centre) and Bobby Neuwirth. Joni Mitchell was there, and Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Ronee Blakley and Roger McQuinn and Gordon Lightfoot. Joan Baez joined in duet with Dylan, her dignity filling hall, according to Star writer Peter Goddard.

4

‘Things Have Changed’

Dylan's career was in a real upswing in 2000. Time Out of Mind, his first album of original material in seven years, won a Grammy for Album of the Year, and the shows on his Never Ending Tour were absolutely amazing night after night. He took this energy back into the studio when director Curtis Hanson asked him to write a song for The Wonder Boys, a film about a college professor (played by Michael Douglas) that gets deeply involved in the chaotic life of a troubled student. The resulting song perfectly captured the vibe of the movie, and it won Dylan an Academy Award for Best Original Song. It also began every show of his 2014 tour, sending off a clear message to people that showed up expecting to hear old hits: "I used to care, but things have changed."

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TORONTO, ON - DECEMBER 2, 1975: His rolling thunder revue making its way toward New York, Bob Dylan (left) last night took centre stage before 16,000 people at Gardens, accompanied by a host of other folk music personalities including Mick Ronson (centre) and Bobby Neuwirth. Joni Mitchell was there, and Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Ronee Blakley and Roger McQuinn and Gordon Lightfoot. Joan Baez joined in duet with Dylan, her dignity filling hall, according to Star writer Peter Goddard.

Frank Lennon/Getty

3

‘Shelter From the Storm’

Blood on the Tracks is filled with songs where Dylan looks back on an ideal relationship that fell completely to pieces. In a rare move, he's even willing to share some of the blame. "Now there's a wall between us, somethin' there's been lost," he sings on "Shelter From the Storm." "I took too much for granted, got my signals crossed." But, as always with Dylan, there's no going back, and she's now merely a fond memory. An alternate take of the song was used on the soundtrack for Jerry Maguire. Should they ever got around to a Blood on the Tracks Bootleg Series, we'll hopefully get to hear a lot more like it.

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TORONTO, ON - DECEMBER 2, 1975: His rolling thunder revue making its way toward New York, Bob Dylan (left) last night took centre stage before 16,000 people at Gardens, accompanied by a host of other folk music personalities including Mick Ronson (centre) and Bobby Neuwirth. Joni Mitchell was there, and Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Ronee Blakley and Roger McQuinn and Gordon Lightfoot. Joan Baez joined in duet with Dylan, her dignity filling hall, according to Star writer Peter Goddard.

2

‘Hurricane’

If you want to learn the complex history of Rubin "Hurricane" Carter's trial and imprisonment for a 1966 triple murder he swore he didn't commit, there are far better sources than Dylan's 1975 song. Co-written with playwright Jacques Levy, the tune was an unabashed work of advocacy on behalf of the boxer. Key details are flubbed, and the narrative is trimmed to make Carter seem like an absolute saint. Although he was almost certainly innocent, the truth is far more complex. But it doesn't really matter. "Hurricane" is extremely powerful, and although it took another decade, Carter was eventually freed from prison.

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TORONTO, ON - DECEMBER 2, 1975: His rolling thunder revue making its way toward New York, Bob Dylan (left) last night took centre stage before 16,000 people at Gardens, accompanied by a host of other folk music personalities including Mick Ronson (centre) and Bobby Neuwirth. Joni Mitchell was there, and Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Ronee Blakley and Roger McQuinn and Gordon Lightfoot. Joan Baez joined in duet with Dylan, her dignity filling hall, according to Star writer Peter Goddard.

1

‘Tangled Up in Blue’

It's hard for people today to quite understand how stunning it was when Dylan released Blood on the Tracks in January of 1975. There hadn't been an undeniably great Dylan record in six very long years, and on the previous year's reunion tour with the Band he often seemed to be sleepwalking through his old hits. But once fans dropped the needle and kicked off the journey with "Tangled Up in Blue," it became clear that none of genius that fueled Blonde on Blonde and Highway 61 Revisited had faded with time. "Tangled Up in Blue" is an odyssey through time and space about two star-crossed lovers. Never happy with the lyrics, Dylan re-wrote a large portion of them for his 1984 European tour. Check it out on the otherwise shaky Real Live.

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