Home Music Music Lists

Readers’ Poll: 10 Best Green Day Deep Cuts

See what surprises and favorites made the list

Readers Poll, 10, Best, Green Day, Deep Cuts

We asked our readers to vote for their favorite Green Day deep cuts. Here are the results.

Photofest

Last week, Green Day made a triumphant return with the fiery "Bang Bang." After a few years away and focusing on personal issues and side projects, the band returned to their punk roots for the first preview of their album Revolution Radio. Since their debut, the pop-punk luminaries have long been filled with surprises, both lyrically and sonically, unafraid to explore genres, themes and ways of relaying stories about youth, love and politics. In honor of the new music from Green Day, we asked our readers to vote for their favorite Green Day deep cuts. Here are the results.

Play video

Photofest

5

“Jesus of Suburbia”

"American Idiot" set the radical tone as the opening track and first single for the album of the same name, but it was second track, "Jesus of Suburbia," that kickstarted the epic tale of a son of rage and love and his journey through and out of a crushing existence in a broken suburban home. The nine-minute epic was the album's ambitious centerpiece, told in five parts that introduced plot points and characters that would be returned to throughout American Idiot without veering too far into musical theater tropes. Due to its length, the song itself didn't quite catch on as a radio hit in the same way previous AI singles did, but its video set a seedy tone explored in the Broadway musical based off of Green Day's heralded rock opera.

Play video

Photofest

4

“Going to Pasalacqua”

Underlying Green Day's early disenfranchisement and later politics has always been a hefty dose of romance. "Going to Pasalacqua," off their 1990 debut album 39/Smooth, rips apart Armstrong's feelings about a relationship that's causing him to feel particularly anxious. By the end of the song, he decides that he'll ignore those insecurities and give the relationship a chance, even if he's not sure what the future holds.

Play video

Photofest

3

“Christie Road”

Green Day's name was inspired by a day spent smoking weed, so naturally many of their early songs are loaded with references to their favorite activity. "Christie Road" was an ode to a specific street where Billie Joe Armstrong and Mike Dirnt would spend their time smoking and escaping from the stresses of life, finding solace with each other and on their own. 

Play video

Photofest

2

“Homecoming”

While "Jesus of Suburbia" felt like a bender of punk-popera, the even longer "Homecoming" felt like the crash and burn of the American Idiot hangover, wrapping up the story of the album's anti-hero who returns to the home he abandoned before diving in drug addiction and despondence in the city. The five-part, nine-minute penultimate track said good-bye to the album's antagonist St. Jimmy as the Jesus of Suburbia found inner-peace — or something like it. 

Play video

Photofest

1

“Whatsername”

Serving as an epilogue of sorts to American Idiot, "Whatsername" has the Jesus of Suburbia reflecting on the girl he loved and who left him as he was dragged deeper into the seedy city he escaped to. It's a gentle ending to an urgent, aggressive album, delivering the most tender self-reflection as the protagonist looks back on his youth with some distance. It's a standout, underrated moment from not only the album but Green Day's career: a simple pop song featuring a song structure that would rival Rubber Soul-era Beatles above an arena-level riff. 

Show Comments