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Our 10 Greatest Hopes and Fears for 2012

2012 is going to be a big year for music. We hope these people don’t screw it up.

David Lee Roth Eddie Van Halen

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Any year that kicks off with the (mostly) original line-up of Van Halen playing a 250-seat club in Greenwich Village is certainly going to be one to remember. Next month, Radiohead kicks off an arena tour in Florida, then in March Bruce Springsteen is slated to launch a tour with the E Street Band. April is going to bring not one, but two Coachella festivals. From there it just gets crazy with reunion tours, festivals and a likely 50th anniversary tour of the Rolling Stones.

We have a lot of high hopes for 2012, but also some fears. Rock tours don't always go as hoped and our heroes sometime disappoint us. Click through to see 10 of our hopes and fears for 2012. 

By Andy Greene

Bob Dylan

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Bob Dylan’s Never-Ending Tour Keeps on Trucking

Hope: Bob Dylan has been on tour since 1988. The show used to go through significant changes every few years, but things have felt rather stagnant since the mid-2000s. Even the return of guitar virtuoso Charlie Sexton failed to shake things up a couple of years ago. In 2002 Dylan played 128 different songs during the course of the year. In 2011 he was down to 64. We hope that next year Dylan shakes up his band line-up a bit, lets some of the members actually harmonize with him again and start playing a more diverse bunch of songs. Also, a killer new album or a Basement Tapes box set would be pretty cool.

Fear: Bob Dylan has earned the right to do whatever he wants, but it would be a bummer if he continued to drastically limit his repertoire of songs and play similar shows year after year. 

Madonna

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Madonna Plots Her Comeback

Hope: Madonna hasn't released a universally praised album since 1998's Ray of Light. Sure, she's released a ton of great songs since then – but the 2000s clearly weren't as great for her fans as the 1980s and 1990s. Working with Timbaland on the last one seemed like a desperate move to remain relevant. The success of Lady Gaga must be bumming her out big time. It's clearly time for a comeback. The Super Bowl Halftime show is a great place to showcase her new single. Hopefully it's great. The tour will undoubtably be amazing, but she doesn't need to be an oldies act. The lady has more hits in her.

Fear: It's tough for veteran artists to land on the radio. We worry that people won't give anything she produces a decent chance. The single is supposed to contain guest spots by Nicki Minaj and M.I.A. That's a pretty good way to get people to listen. Madonna is 53, but there's no reason she can't continue to be the world's biggest pop star.