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Emerson, Lake and Palmer: 10 Essential Songs

The greatest from the audacious, virtuosic progressive rock icons

Emerson, Lake and Palmer

Emerson, Lake and Palmer were virtuosic progressive rock icons.

LFI/Photoshot

"I was scared shitless," the late Keith Emerson told Mojo in 2001, remembering the start of Emerson, Lake & Palmer's 1977 tour of America — at the time, the most extravagant rock tour ever assembled. The setup legendarily included drummer Carl Palmer's karate instructor, an army of roadies and, least practical of all, a full orchestra. Despite the cost and difficulty, "we had to be honest with our fans," Emerson said. "My piano concerto on our double album, Works, which accompanied the tour, was augmented by an orchestra, and what you hear on the record is what you expect to hear when you buy the ticket to the show!"

That is the majesty of ELP. Veterans of a variety of Sixties British rock bands — Emerson played in the Nice, Palmer hailed from Atomic Rooster and Greg Lake migrated from King Crimson — ELP became one of rock's first supergroups upon forming in 1970. In fact, ELP practically defined the term. Before punk came along and took progressive rock down a peg, the trio enjoyed the kind of success that could have only happened in the Seventies, when musicians strained at the confines of two-minute singles and dance-ready beats.

The result was a stretch of albums — as well as a smattering of fluke radio hits like 1970's melancholy "Lucky Man" — that turned prog from a black-light-in-the-basement listening experience into a stadium-filling phenomenon. At their heart was Emerson, whose eternal quest for a bigger, grander sound (thanks to a bank of organs and synthesizers that grew to resemble a fortress onstage) helped make ELP one of the most accomplished and absorbing bands rock ever birthed. Here are a few of their shining moments.

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“Still… You Turn Me On” (1973)

"Rock technology is just not yet advanced enough," Emerson lamented in a New York Times interview in 1973. Like the rest of the band, he was always groping for the next innovation that might fuel ELP's evolution — although on "Still… You Turn Me On" from the group's fourth album, Brain Salad Surgery, the notoriously tech-driven outfit pared things down. Relatively speaking, anyway; the Lake-penned tune doesn't go in for many frills, relying instead on a luscious melody and Emerson's tasteful synth flourishes — not to mention a startling dose of a different kind of innovation, at least for ELP: funk. Mostly it's the balance between Lake's songcraft and Emerson's atmosphere that makes "Still… You Turn Me On" so timeless. Even when obsessed with the sounds of the future, ELP knew a good tune was always at the heart of their art. J.H.

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“Karn Evil 9” (1973)

One of the most iconic progressive rock epics ever recorded, "Karn Evil 9" embodied everything that prog was both loved and reviled for. A staggeringly complex and ambitious work in three "impressions," the centerpiece of 1973's Brain Salad Surgery explored the weighty theme of man versus technology, while also giving the band members ample space in which to showcase their instrumental virtuosity. Though truly "the show that never ends" to the band's detractors, the half-hour-long dystopian fantasy sounds prescient today. "It was the start of computer technology, and already we were being accused of using computer technology in our instrumentation to the point that some people actually believed that when we played onstage it wasn't us!" Keith Emerson recalled in 2000. "When we did it live I had the Moog turn around, face the audience and blow up while we left the stage. It was like saying, 'This is computer technology and it's taking over.'" D.E.

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Emerson, Lake and Palmer

“Fanfare for the Common Man” (1977)

The first track on the collaborative side of ELP's solo-centric double album Works Volume 1, "Fanfare for the Common Man" was adapted from a 1942 composition by Aaron Copland, whom Keith Emerson regarded as "the soul of American music." Emerson transposed Copland's score to the key of E, and the band recorded the track as an inspired first take that sandwiches a nasty blues shuffle between straight-forward renditions of Copland's theme, which led the composer to observe, "What they do in the middle, I'm not sure exactly how they connect that with my music but [laughs] they do it someway, I suppose." Released with the composer's blessing, the trio's 10-minute adaptation would become a ubiquitous fist pumper during many televised sports events. R.G.

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