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Best Summer Songs of All Time

School’s out, and it’s time to get down, get sunburned and get lucky

Best Summer Songs

Blondie, Marvin Gaye, Donna Summer

Brian Cooke/Redferns, Rob Verhorst/Redferns, Michael Putland/Getty Images

The summer song is one of rock’s truest pleasures, be it a dance jam that dominates every backyard cookout or a sweet ode to cars, girls and partying at the beach. Here are our picks for the most sizzling summer jams ever – from unshakeable oldies to classic hip-hop, from hard-rock to indie-rock, from the Go-Gos to Daft Punk. School’s out, and it’s time to get down, get sunburned and get lucky.

Jonathan Richman
44

“That Summer Feeling,” Jonathan Richman

On this simple, mournful song, the former Modern Lover strums a tribute to the summer moments that haunt you and taunt you as you get older. You know you're in trouble, Richman croons, "When even fourth grade starts looking good (which you hated)." Pretty much every indie rock song about summer builds off this.

Gordon Gano and Brian Ritchie of Violent Femmes
43

“Blister In the Sun,” Violent Femmes

Pro tip: Always wear sunscreen, especially when you're pasty pent-up dudes like the Violent Femmes. Over a torqued up acoustic surf-punk, Gordon Gano gave us one of rock's great odes to pencil-necked, acne-scarred horniness. This unlikely hit exploded like an over-ripe zit all over John Hughes America in the mid-Eighties.

Chicago
42

“Saturday In the Park,” Chicago

The brass-powered soft-rockers pretty much perfect Seventies mellowness on this radio staple, a shout out to Central Park written while the band was recording in New York. Singer Robert Lamm can't remember exactly when he visited the park ("I think it was the Fourth of July") but he had such a chill time he can't wait to get back ("I've been waiting such a long time/For today"). Check out the open-air tropical air aviary at the zoo, man. It's awesome!

Ezra Koenig of Vampire Weekend
41

“Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa,” Vampire Weekend

In their bright collared shirts and boat shoes, Vampire Weekend looked like they just back from an Ivy League yacht party and this Afro-pop-tinged ode to Benetton babes chilling on sandy lawns was unnaturally brilliant, updating the sweetest Paul Simon for a new generation of restless rich kids.

Mac McCaughan of Superchunk
40

“This Summer,” Superchunk

Arriving a year after these indie-rock heroes' great 2010 comeback album Majesty Shredding, this is a fist-pumping tune about getting psyched for summer that reflects on summers past. The lyrics describe sleeping bags and tape hiss and a beach house with "sweaty sheets and an ocean view." Mac McCaughan sings, "I age backwards when I'm next to you/So erase this summer with me" as the guitars burn away.

Pete Quaife, Ray Davies, Mick Avory and Dave Davies of The Kinks
39

“Sunny Afternoon,” The Kinks

Released in June of 1966, this Ray Davies tune taps into English music hall tradition with a jaunty wistful melody; Davies plays a rich kid who's been busted out by the tax man, scrapped by his girlfriend and left with little more than "my ice cold beer/lazing on a sunny afternoon in the summertime." It's like the Beatles' "Taxman" as satire.

Morrissey of The Smiths
38

“Cemetry Gates,” The Smiths

What does Morrissey do during "a dreaded sunny day?" Why, hang around among the headstone, arguing the merits of his man Oscar Wilde versus Williams Butler Yeats and John Keats, of course. The song's supple groove – part acoustic guitar strum, part distinctive bass lope and lithe drums – lightens the mood considerably. Note to students on summer vacation: "If you must write prose and poems/the words you use should be your own."

Martha Davis and Michael Goodroe of The Motels
37

“Suddenly Last Summer,” The Motels

Motels singer Martha Davis reflects on the eternal cycle of good and bad summers: "One summer never ends/One summer never begins" on this spacey slice of good old-fashioned New Wave cheese. Shout out to the ice cream truck in the video!

Nathan Williams of Wavves
36

“King Of The Beach,” Wavves

Surf-punk heaven from some guitar-slashing stoners. Nathan Williams whines about the sun burning his eyes and his back at the beach in his dreams as a basement-studio mix of fuzzed up guitars and crackling drums shred right through his sunstroke bravado.

Jeff Tweedy of Wilco
35

“Heavy Metal Drummer,” Wilco

Combining the wistful essence of alt-country and the gummy groove fun of hip-hop, Jeff Tweedy came up the perfect song about rocking out in the landing in the summer, "playing KISS covers, beautiful and stoned." The nostalgic ache is undeniable to anyone who associates rock music with getting wasted by a lake.

Rob Bass and DJ E-Z Rock
34

“It Takes Two,” Rob Base and DJ E-Z Rock

In the summer of 1988, kids at block parties from Brooklyn to Boise skipped rope and played hopscotch and got down to "It Takes Two," the quintessential James Brown-sampling club banger. Writer-producer Rob Base penned it with the hopes of coming up with a song so fun everybody couldn't help but jam to it. Mission accomplished.

33

“Steal My Sunshine,” Len

The late-Nineties was full of light hip-hop influenced alt-pop by bands like Sugar Ray and Smash Mouth, and this brother-sister duo from Toronto topped them all with this buoyant shot of Beck-esque bubblegum. Marc and Sharon Costanzo were thinking of the Human League's summer-of-'82 smash "Don't You Want Me" when they wrote this loopy tune about sippin' slurpy treats, fryin' on a bench slide in the park and teenage romance gone weird: "my mind was thugged, all laced and bugged, all twisted round and beat."

Ricky Wilson, Cindy Wilson, Keith Strickland, Kate Pierson and Fred Schneider of The B-52's
32

“Rock Lobster,” The B-52s

The great Southern New Wave party band's 1979 novelty hit was a wild, winking throwback to the innocent silliness of Sixties dance crazes. The surfed-up guitar part and Fred Schneider's brilliant Jacques Cousteau-gone-bonkers lyrics ("There goes a dog-fish, chased by a cat-fish, in flew a sea robin, watch out for that piranha, there goes a narwhal, here comes a bikini whale!") made it a psychedelic beach rocker for the ages.

Donna Summer
31

“Hot Stuff,” Donna Summer

In 1973, LaDonna Andrea Gaines married Austrian actor Helmuth Sommer and repurposed his last name for her own stage name, assuring her inclusion on this list. "Hot Stuff" topped the chart in June 1979, a sex-craving disco anthem with grinding rock guitar courtesy Steely Dan/Doobie Brothers sideman Jeff "Skunk" Baxter.

Chubby Checker
30

“Let’s Twist Again,” Chubby Checker

Rock and roll was only a few years old when Chubby Checker recorded the original nostalgic party jam – "let's twist again like we did last summer," he sings, looking back from the summer of 1961 on the twist-mad summer of 1960. The chugging beat and Chubby's big, smiling delivery make this the ultimate "twist" song and a timeless dancefloor-filler.

Martha Reeves and the Vandellas
29

“(Love Is Like A) Heat Wave,” Martha & The Vandellas

A firecracker ode to unbearable weather, Martha & The Vandellas' second hit single shot up the chart in the summer of 1963, and it can still dial up the temperature any time a lazy oldies radio DJ uses it to follow a nasty weather forecast. Alabama-born Martha Reeves sings about a guy who's hot she gives her a fever over a high-energy R&B groove that was one of the earliest moments of genius for Motown's Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team.

Debbie Harry of Blondie
28

“In The Sun,” Blondie

Like the Ramones, Blondie mixed a tough New York attitude with a love of Sixties bubblegum pop. "Surf's up!" Debbie Harry yells over a "Wipeout" drum beat on this sleek, moody surf-rocker from their 1976 debut, an ode to getting out the gray city and hitting the beach. "Where is my wave," she wonders. Just a subway ride away.

Eric Church
27

“Springsteen,” Eric Church

A perfect country song about memories of Born In the USA as the "soundtrack to a July Saturday night," Eric Church's 2012 hit is so vivid you can almost smell the bug spray and Budweiser. Hooked to a spare melody and full of unforgettable images ("Discount shades, store bought tan, flip-flops and cut off jeans," he sings, describing his Boss-loving high school girlfriend), it evokes hot summer nights with bittersweet nostalgia.