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500 Greatest Songs of All Time

Rolling Stone’s definitive list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.

By Jay-Z

A great song doesn’t attempt to be anything — it just is.

When you hear a great song, you can think of where you were when you first heard it, the sounds, the smells. It takes the emotions of a moment and holds it for years to come. It transcends time. A great song has all the key elements — melody; emotion; a strong statement that becomes part of the lexicon; and great production. Think of “Bohemian Rhapsody,” by Queen. That song had everything — different melodies, opera, R&B, rock — and it explored all of those different genres in an authentic way, where it felt natural.

When I’m writing a song that I know is going to work, it’s a feeling of euphoria. It’s how a basketball player must feel when he starts hitting every shot, when you’re in that zone. As soon as you start, you get that magic feeling, an extra feeling. Songs like that come out in five minutes; if I work on them more than, say, 20 minutes, they’re probably not going to work.

Read Jay-Z’s full essay here.

230

Muddy Waters, ‘Mannish Boy’

Writers: McKinley Morganfield, Mel London, Ellas McDaniel
Producers:
Leonard and Phil Chess, Willie Dixon
Released:
May '55, Chess
Did not chart

After Waters heard Bo Diddley audition "I'm a Man" for Chess, he replied with "Mannish Boy." (Diddley got a credit as McDaniel, his real name.) Both songs were issued in 1955 and shot into the R&B Top 10. "When I heard him, I realized the connection between all the music I heard," Keith Richards said of Waters. "He was like the code book."

Appears on: The Anthology (MCA/Chess)

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100 Greatest Singers of All Time: Muddy Waters

500 Greatest Albums of All Time: Muddy Waters’ The Anthology

229

Chic, ‘Good Times’

Writers: Nile Rodgers, Bernard Edwards
Producers:
Rodgers, Edwards
Released:
June '79, Atlantic
19 weeks; No. 1

The tone was half-ironic when Chic released "Good Times," a hedonistic roller-disco tune, during the Seventies recession. The other half was pure joy, and Edwards' bass line – bouncing on one note, then climbing – proved too snappy for just one song. Queen borrowed it for "Another One Bites the Dust"; in the South Bronx, the Sugarhill Gang put it under "Rapper's Delight."

Appears on: Risqué (Atlantic)

228

The Clash, ‘Should I Stay or Should I Go’

Writers: The Clash
Producer:
Glyn Johns
Released:
May '82, Epic
13 weeks; No. 45

"My main influences," Mick Jones said, "are Mott the Hoople, the Kinks and the Stones" – which explains this choppy riff. Jones yells "Split!" because Joe Strummer snuck up behind him while he was recording his vocals. The chorus hints at the band's end: At the time, "none of us were really talking to each other," said Paul Simonon. The original four were soon no more.

Appears on: Combat Rock (Sony)

227

James Taylor, ‘Fire and Rain’

Writer: Taylor
Producer:
Peter Asher
Released:
Feb. '70, Warner Bros.
16 weeks; No. 3

Taylor wrote the three verses of this song in three phases following the breakup of his band the Flying Machine. The first came in a London flat while he was signed to the Apple label, the second in a New York hospital as he kicked heroin and the third during a stay in a Massachusetts psychiatric facility. "It's like three samplings of what I went through," he said.

Appears on: Sweet Baby James (Warner Bros.)

RELATED:

100 Greatest Artists of All Time: James Taylor

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226

Muddy Waters, ‘Hoochie Coochie Man’

Writer: Willie Dixon
Producers:
Leonard and Phil Chess, Dixon
Released:
Jan. '54, Chess
Did not chart

Waters tested this out at the Chicago blues club Zanzibar. Dixon gave him some advice: "Well, just get a little rhythm pattern," he said. "Do the same thing over again, y'know." Waters cut it a couple of weeks later, with Dixon on bass.

Appears on: The Anthology (Chess/MCA)

RELATED:

100 Greatest Artists of All Time: Muddy Waters

100 Greatest Singers of All Time: Muddy Waters

500 Greatest Albums of All Time: Muddy Waters’ The Anthology