500 Greatest Songs of All Time – Rolling Stone
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500 Greatest Songs of All Time

Rolling Stone’s definitive list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.

By Jay-Z

A great song doesn’t attempt to be anything — it just is.

When you hear a great song, you can think of where you were when you first heard it, the sounds, the smells. It takes the emotions of a moment and holds it for years to come. It transcends time. A great song has all the key elements — melody; emotion; a strong statement that becomes part of the lexicon; and great production. Think of “Bohemian Rhapsody,” by Queen. That song had everything — different melodies, opera, R&B, rock — and it explored all of those different genres in an authentic way, where it felt natural.

When I’m writing a song that I know is going to work, it’s a feeling of euphoria. It’s how a basketball player must feel when he starts hitting every shot, when you’re in that zone. As soon as you start, you get that magic feeling, an extra feeling. Songs like that come out in five minutes; if I work on them more than, say, 20 minutes, they’re probably not going to work.

Read Jay-Z’s full essay here.

280

Bruce Springsteen, ‘Born in the U.S.A.’

Writer: Springsteen
Producers: Springsteen, Jon Landau, Chuck Plotkin, Steve Van Zandt
Released: June '84, Columbia
17 weeks; No. 9

Before it became the centerpiece of Springsteen’s biggest album, "U.S.A." was an acoustic protest song meant for Nebraska. But when Springsteen revived it with the E Street Band, Roy Bittan came up with a huge synth riff, and Max Weinberg hammered out a beat like he was using M-80s for drumsticks. "We played it two times, and our second take is the record," Springsteen said.

Appears on: Born in the U.S.A. (Columbia)

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279

Jefferson Airplane, ‘Somebody to Love’

Writer: Darby Slick
Producer: Rick Jarrard
Released: Feb. '67, RCA
15 weeks; No. 5

"Somebody" was about "doubt and disillusionment," according to Darby Slick, who wrote it in the Great Society. His sister-in-law Grace brought the song to the Airplane, whose hard-edged rendition became one of the S.F. scene’s first hits. The Airplane made buttons that read jefferson airplane loves you; Great Society countered with ones that said the great society really doesn’t like you much at all.

Appears on: Surrealistic Pillow (RCA)

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278

The Beatles, ‘Something’

Writer: George Harrison
Producer: George Martin
Released: Oct. '69, Apple
16 weeks; No. 3

Harrison wrote “Something” near the end of the White Album sessions (one placeholder lyric: "Something in the way she moves/Attracts me like a cauliflower"). It was too late to squeeze it onto the disc, so he gave it to Joe Cocker. The Beatles cut a new version the next year with a string section, which would become a standard recorded by everyone from Frank Sinatra to Ray Charles.

Appears on: Abbey Road (Apple)

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