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500 Greatest Albums of All Time

Rolling Stone’s definitive list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

The RS 500 was assembled by the editors of Rolling Stone, based on the results of two extensive polls. In 2003, Rolling Stone asked a panel of 271 artists, producers, industry executives and journalists to pick the greatest albums of all time. In 2009, we asked a similar group of 100 experts to pick the best albums of the 2000s. From those results, Rolling Stone created this new list of the greatest albums of all time.

129

Talking Heads, ‘Remain in Light’

Sire, 1980

On this New Wave watershed, the avant-punk avatars became polyrhythmic pop magicians. David Byrne and Co. combined the thrust of P-Funk, the kinky grooves of Afropop and the studied adventurousness of producer Brian Eno – and they still had a pop hit with "Once in a Lifetime."

128

Iggy and the Stooges, ‘Raw Power’

Columbia, 1973

Iggy Pop had dyed silver hair and a hard-drug habit when David Bowie helped get the rudderless Stooges a deal with Columbia. Pop and new guitarist James Williamson responded with hellbent ferocity on punk eruptions like "Search and Destroy" and "Gimme Danger."

127

The Byrds, ‘Younger Than Yesterday’

Columbia, 1967

Amid internal strife, the former Next Beatles made their first mature album, a blend of space-flight twang and electric hoedown infused with the glow of 1967 yet cut with realism.

126

Bob Marley and the Wailers, ‘Catch a Fire’

Island, 1973

Marley's major-label debut expanded his audience beyond Jamaica without diluting his bedrock reggae power. Producer and label boss Chris Blackwell remixed the original Jamaican sessions for international ears, but the Wailers' ghetto rage comes across uncut.

125

Janis Joplin, ‘Pearl’

Columbia, 1971

On Pearl, Joplin made a solo album worthy of her Texas blues-mama wail. Whether singing hippie gospel or country soul, she never sounded more intimate and assured. "Me and Bobby McGee" was a Number One single, but Joplin didn’t get to enjoy her triumph. She died of a drug overdose before the album was finished.

124

Moby Grape, ‘Moby Grape’

Columbia, 1967

San Francisco rock at its '67 peak, this is genuine hippie power pop. Moby Grape sang like demons and wrote crisp songs packed with lysergic country-blues excitement, while the band's three guitarists – Jerry Miller, Peter Lewis and Skip Spence – created a network of lightning.

123

Run-DMC, ‘Raising Hell’

Arista, 1986

Working with producer Rick Rubin, the Queens crew made an undeniable album that forced the mainstream to cross over to hip-hop. Run and DMC talked trash over Jam Master Jay's killer mixology, and they bum-rushed MTV with a vandalistic cover of Aerosmith's "Walk This Way," featuring Steven Tyler and Joe Perry.

122

Original Soundtrack, ‘The Harder They Come’

Mango, 1973

This album took reggae worldwide. The film's star, Jimmy Cliff, sings four songs, including the hymn "Many Rivers to Cross," and greats like Desmond Dekker, the Melodians, and Toots and the Maytals showed the richness of the new beat.

121

Sly and the Family Stone, ‘Stand!’

Epic, 1969

Funk-rock-soul party politics at its most inclusive and exciting – Sly Stone rides the bonfire momentum of the civil rights movement in "Stand!" and "You Can Make It If You Try" without denying the intrinsic divisions that threatened civil war (see "Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey").