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500 Greatest Albums of All Time

Rolling Stone’s definitive list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

The RS 500 was assembled by the editors of Rolling Stone, based on the results of two extensive polls. In 2003, Rolling Stone asked a panel of 271 artists, producers, industry executives and journalists to pick the greatest albums of all time. In 2009, we asked a similar group of 100 experts to pick the best albums of the 2000s. From those results, Rolling Stone created this new list of the greatest albums of all time.

486

Earth, Wind and Fire, ‘That’s the Way of the World’

Columbia, 1975

Before he got into African thumb pianos and otherworldly philosophizing, EWF founder Maurice White was a session drummer at Chess Studios. EWF’s sixth album is make-out music of the gods. Listen here.

485

Pearl Jam, ‘Vitalogy’

Epic, 1994

Their previous album, Vs., made Pearl Jam the most successful band in the world. They celebrated by suing Ticketmaster and making Vitalogy, where their mastery of rock’s past and future became complete. Soulful ballads like “Nothingman” are matched by hardcore-influenced rockers such as “Spin the Black Circle.” Listen here.

484

Mott the Hoople, ‘All the Young Dudes’

Columbia, 1972

Mott were a hard-rock band with a Dylan fixation until David Bowie got ahold of them. He penned the androgyne title track and had them cover Lou Reed‘s “Sweet Jane.” Mott would sound more soulful but never more sexy or glittery. Listen here.

483

Gang of Four, ‘Entertainment!’

Warner Bros., 1979

Formed in 1977, Gang of Four combined Marxist politics with punk rock. They played staccato guitar-driven funk, and the stiff, jerky aggression of songs such as “Damaged Goods” and “I Found That Essence Rare” invented a new style that influenced bands from the Minutemen to LCD Soundsystem. Listen here.

482

Steve Earle, ‘Guitar Town’

MCA, 1986

“I got a two-pack habit and a motel tan,” Earle sings on the title track. By the time he released his debut at 31, he had done two stints in Nashville as a songwriter and he wanted something else. Guitar Town is the rocker’s version of country, packed with songs about hard living in the Reagan Eighties. Listen here.

481

D’Angelo, ‘Voodoo’

Virgin, 2000

D’Angelo recorded his second album at Electric Lady, the Manhattan studio built by Jimi Hendrix. There he studied bootleg videos of Sixties and Seventies soul singers and cooked up an album heavy on bass and drenched in a post-coital haze. The single “Untitled (How Does It Feel?)” sounds like a great lost Prince song. Listen here.

480

Raekwon, ‘Only Built 4 Cuban Linx

Loud, 1995

The best Wu-Tang solo joint is a study in understated cool and densely woven verses. Over RZA’s hypnotically stark beats, Raekwon crafts breathtaking drug-rap narratives; it’s a rap album that rivals the mob movies hip-hop celebrates. Listen here.

479

Funkadelic, ‘Maggot Brain’

Westbound, 1971

“Play like your mama just died,” George Clinton told guitarist Eddie Hazel. The result was “Maggot Brain,” 10 minutes of Hendrix-style guitar anguish. This is the heaviest rock album the P-Funk ever created, but it also made room for the acoustic-guitar funk of “Can You Get to That.” Listen here.

478

Loretta Lynn, ‘All Time Greatest Hits’

MCA Nashville, 2002

Anyone who thinks a woman singing country music is cute should listen to “Fist City,” where Lynn threatens to beat down a woman if she doesn’t lay off her man. Seventies greats like “Rated ‘X'” and “The Pill” brought feminism to the honky-tonks.