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500 Greatest Albums of All Time

Rolling Stone’s definitive list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

The RS 500 was assembled by the editors of Rolling Stone, based on the results of two extensive polls. In 2003, Rolling Stone asked a panel of 271 artists, producers, industry executives and journalists to pick the greatest albums of all time. In 2009, we asked a similar group of 100 experts to pick the best albums of the 2000s. From those results, Rolling Stone created this new list of the greatest albums of all time.

324

David Bowie, ‘Station to Station’

RCA, 1976

The Kraut-disco title track is where Bowie proclaims himself the Thin White Duke. Thin he was: Station to Station was recorded in a blizzard of cocaine in Los Angeles. "TVC 15" is New Orleans R&B as robotic funk; "Golden Years" is James Brown from outer space, with Bowie's amazing falsetto.

323

The Police, ‘Ghost in the Machine’

A&M, 1981

Here, the previously punkish trio added synth strings and politics, and blew up even further. "Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic" is a pop smart bomb, and "Invisible Sun," about the violence in Northern Ireland, is genuinely moving.

322

Randy Newman, ‘Sail Away’

Reprise, 1972

Producer Lenny Waronker called him the King of the Suburban Blues Singers. This is Newman's quiet masterpiece, less rock than fuck-you cabaret. Even now, "Political Science" ("Let's drop the big one/And see what happens") is relevant; either Newman is brilliant or we haven't come a long way, baby.

321

Nick Drake, ‘Pink Moon’

Island, 1972

Drake recorded his last album in a couple of nights, delivered the tapes to Island Records and checked himself into a psychiatric ward. If the music were as dark as the lyrics, it might be unlistenable. But Drake's soothing vocals and unadorned acoustic picking make Moon unfold with supernatural tenderness.

320

Radiohead, ‘Amnesiac’

Capitol, 2001

The greatest sequel since The Godfather: Part II. The second half of the one-two punch Radiohead began with Kid A was smoother on the surface yet just as disorienting underneath, bringing more of the rock guitars that its predecessor held back, but in all kinds of mutated forms. 

319

The Wailers, ‘Burnin’ ‘

Island, 1973

Righteous and seriously in the pocket, this is the last Wailers album with Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. Bob Marley's soulful cry is rivaled by the sticky organ riffs and fat-bottom beats, and their original version of "I Shot the Sheriff" is far more desperate than Eric Clapton's hit cover.

318

The O’Jays, ‘Back Stabbers’

Philadelphia International, 1972

After Vietnam and Watergate, soul music slipped into darkness in the early Seventies. The title track of this Philly-soul album was the writing on the wall: funky and paranoid, much like the times.

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