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50 Greatest Boy Band Songs of All Time

From the Monkees to 1D: pre-fab pop’s most scream-worthy songs

'N Sync, The Osmonds and Backstreet Boys

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Irresistibly catchy, unapologetically inauthentic, sexy and they know it — the boy band is the most fabulously pre-fab of all musical outfits. From the scripted TV shenanigans of the Monkees to the surprisingly grown One Direction, as long as there are junior high school notebooks to deface, there will be outfits providing pop spectacle in its purist, least filtered form.

In deciding the right stuff for a list of the 50 greatest boy band songs, we had to exclude bands that weren’t sufficiently svengali’d (apologies to Hanson and 5 Seconds of Summer — you kept it too real) and avoided acts too close to the Motown vocal group tradition (Boyz II Men, All-4-One and even Color Me Badd just seemed too much like our old 45s). What remains is a plethora of sugary delights from Eighties malls, Nineties Total Request Live playlists, contemporary X-Factor seasons, our Korean pop future and more. Check out the list below, and click here to listen to a playlist of all the songs.

SHINee

ilgan Sports/Multi-Bits via Getty Images

12

SHINee, “Sherlock” (2012)

"Sherlock" isn't an entirely original song, but instead the combination of two separate tracks by Korean quintet SHINee. Mashing up two cuts off the band's 2012 Sherlock EP — the bouncy hip-hopper "Clue" and the impressive vocal track "Note" — "Sherlock" was touted as Korea's first "hybrid remix" single. As an already beloved, already chart-topping boy band under Korea's biggest music label, SM Entertainment, the Jackson 5-recalling tune shows how innovative and experimental K-pop can get, even for its most mainstream acts.

New Edition

UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1970: Photo of New Edition Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

11

New Edition, “Candy Girl” (1983)

When Maurice Starr saw Ricky Bell, Michael Bivins, Bobby Brown, Ronnie DeVoe and Ralph Tresvant at a talent show in the Dorchester section of Boston, he had a feeling . . . that he had another Jackson 5 on his hands. Enter "Candy Girl," an extra-sugary update of the Jacksons' "ABC" that gave New Edition their first taste of fame. Tresvant's high, sweet voice made him the band's Michael analogue, but the bridge — where the boys rap their devotionals to their girls of choice — added just enough edge to help it top the R&B chart in the U.S.

One Direction

NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 07: (L-R) Louis Tomlinson, Liam Payne, Harry Styles, Zayn Malik and Niall Horan of One Direction perform onstage during Z100's Jingle Ball 2012, presented by Aeropostale, at Madison Square Garden on December 7, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Kane/Getty Images for Jingle Ball 2012)

Kevin Kane/Getty Images for Jingle Ball 2012

10

One Direction, “Story of My Life” (2013)

"Story of My Life" changed the musical course of this glossy X-Factor crew. Their third album, 2013's Midnight Memories, saw the boys not only co-writing their songs but exploring Def Leppard-style hair metal, Big Star-esque power pop and Mumford & Sons-infused folk rock. "Story of My Life" was the clear star, featuring an adult-pop guitar riff and soaring vocals from matured members who found a way to gracefully enter adulthood together. "The demo that we played the boys sounds a lot more folk-y than it does now," co-writer Jamie Scott told MTV. "That's what amazing about their voices — straight away it sounds like them."

New Kids on the Block

UNSPECIFIED - circa 1970: Photo of NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK (Photo by Michel Linssen/Redferns)

Michel Linssen/Redferns

9

New Kids on the Block, “You Got It (The Right Stuff)” (1988)

This lighter-than-air bubblegum track was the second single from New Kids' Hangin' Tough, and it ably showed off Jordan Knight's ability to embody an R&B crooner. It's a bit of an improbable hit, if only because it has so much space — thumping bass and drums, synth hits only when absolutely necessary, Knight's voice carrying the whole thing on a wave of infatuation and moxie. (Not to mention the Bauhaus shirt he wore in the song's careening-around-Boston video.) But that mix, especially when added to the "oh, oh, oh-oh-oh" chant that became a siren call in school hallways, was — and is — a potent one.