50 Best Albums of 2018 – Rolling Stone
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50 Best Albums of 2018

2018 was all about bold new voices breaking out of the margins and being heard — from Latin-pop party-starters to feminist guitar heroes to a new school of hip-hop revolutionaries.

best albums

This year felt more like a changing of the guard than any year in recent memory. There weren’t as many superstar blockbusters to suck up all the oxygen so younger innovators got the attention they deserved. It was a fantastic year for ambitious Latin-pop, psychedelic Southern rap, Gen Z indie rock and boundary-defying country. Janelle Monáe paid respect to Prince by updating his joyfully fluid legacy; singers like Ariana Grande and Camila Cabello brought new emotional depth to the top of the charts; beloved veterans like Paul McCartney, Elvis Costello, David Byrne and John Prine made inventive, richly insightful albums; and Drake somehow found a way to elevate his Drake-ness to even more exaltant new heights — proof that in the music world of 2018 anything was possible.

Travis Scott, Astroworld
6

Travis Scott, ‘Astroworld’

Astroworld is a monument to excess in a year overcome with bloat. What it took Kanye West five albums to do, his protege accomplished in 17 songs. Grandiose, intricate, and ferocious, Travis Scott’s quixotic epic honors the past and present of his hometown Houston with the biggest beats, smartest transitions and best guest list he’s ever come up with. “Who put this shit together, I’m the glue,” Scott defiantly proclaimed on “Sicko Mode.” The Glue has built the best rap album of the year.

Ariana Grande Sweetener
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Ariana Grande, ‘Sweetener’

Ariana Grande has had an extremely less-than-enviable couple years: tragedy, heartbreak and loss have all coincided during the process of not only writing and recording her incredible album Sweetener but also while promoting it. Her 2018 LP turns the tartest of lemons into the tastiest lemonade with its Pharrell and Max Martin-assisted, left-field R&B-pop. Tracks like the clubby “No Tears Left to Cry” and Imogen Heap-interpolating “Goodnight n Go” are some of her most experimental and personality-capturing songs yet. Thank u, more please.

Pistol Annies Interstate Gospel
4

Pistol Annies, ‘Interstate Gospel’

With Miranda Lambert, Ashley Monroe and Angeleena Presley – three of country’s greatest talents — singing and writing together, this supergroup is a true group, part of why the songs on their third set cut so deep. The dark sides of love and marriage get met with sass (“Got My Name Changed Back”) or, more often, rue (“Best Years of My Life,” “When I Was His Wife”), and the songs stand with each woman’s best. And the band – including vets Chuck Leavell (Allman Brothers) and Dan Dugmore (Seventies Linda Ronstadt) — roots them in rock and country equally.

Camila Cabello Camila
3

Camila Cabello, ‘Camila’ 

The year’s most exciting debut album lays incredible groundwork for what will ultimately be a long career. Camila is a brilliant statement of intent: mature without theatrics, grounded in her history and, of course, deliciously catchy. Runaway hit “Havana” set the tone, with Cabello reminding us that she wasn’t going to just hit the trends when it came to securing her pop voice. Instead, Camila melds together touches of rock, old school latin pop and traditional singer-songwriter cues for an indelibly honest portrait of the artist as a young woman.

Kacey Musgraves Golden Hour
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Kacey Musgraves, ‘Golden Hour’

Her pop breakthrough was more than just Musgraves’ transformation from Loretta Lynn-styled country music subversive into a cosmic soft-rock cowgirl (with disco leanings). It was a sly exploding of all rules dictating what constituted “country” in 2018. It went top five pop and hit #1 on the country charts, all with — predictably — scant support from mainstream country radio. The LP is expansive yet down-home, chill despite its grand ambitions delivering gracious wonder (“Slow Burn”), trademark sass (“High Horse”), Daft Punky vocoder (“Oh, What A World”), and an LSD-inspired song about her mom (“Mother”).

Cardi B Invasion Of Privacy
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Cardi B, ‘Invasion of Privacy’

“I’m a rich bitch and I smell like it,” Cardi B announces on her instant-classic debut. Cardi could’ve followed up the bloody-shoed success of “Bodak Yellow” with an LP of funny Twitter snaps. Instead, Invasion of Privacy established her as an innovator with her own instantly influential voice — whether she’s claiming the Dirty South in “Bickenhead” or celebrating her Dominican flash in “I Like It,” with Bad Bunny and J Balvin. In a year when hip-hop seemed mopey and insular, her neon-bomb charisma and willingness to stomp on our pop pleasure buttons was incredibly refreshing. She starts out in the strip clubs, wears off-white to church (“make the preacher sweat” rhymes with “Jesus wept”), makes her man stutter in “Be Careful” and teams up with SZA for the climactic “I Do,” proclaiming, “I think us bad bitches is a gift from God.” Amen, Cardi.

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