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20 Best Jazz Albums of 2018

Heady fusions, hard-grooving breakouts and timeless elegance: our favorites from a stellar year

best jazz of 2018

We run down the year's finest in new jazz, including Wayne Shorter, Cécile McLorin Salvant and the Bad Plus.

In 2018, jazz continued to surge into new zones, with up-and-comers like Chicago’s Makaya McCraven and London’s Nubya Garcia and Shabaka Hutchings stirring up serious street-level buzz. Meanwhile, the old guard kept right on pushing, as master musicians in their seventies and eighties — from saxophonists Wayne Shorter, Charles Lloyd and Peter Brötzmann to drummer Andrew Cyrille — turned in outstanding, challenging work. High-profile archival finds like John Coltrane’s Lost Album and Charles Mingus’ Jazz in Detroit kept some attention focused on the past, but a flood of excellent new releases assured that the present stayed front and center. Here are 20 highlights.

The Bad Plus Never Stop II
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The Bad Plus, ‘Never Stop II’

During their initial 17-year run, the Bad Plus built up a reputation as one of the most tight-knit groups in contemporary jazz, the rare example of a die-hard working band in an era where ever-shuffling personnel is the norm. That seemed to change last year, though, when the trio announced that Orrin Evans — a seasoned mid-career pianist and a longtime friend of TBP bassist Reid Anderson — would be stepping in for charismatic co-founder Ethan Iverson. So it’s both a surprise and a delight that their debut with Evans, framed as a sequel of sorts to 2010’s outstanding Never Stop, sounded so much like Bad Plus business-as-usual, with poignant, lucid melodies set against proggy complexity and rowdy improvisational dust-ups. The album didn’t feel like a new chapter so much as a signal to longtime fans that Anderson and drummer Dave King’s commitment to their core aesthetic hadn’t wavered in the slightest. (A happy footnote: Iverson’s own first album since leaving the group — Temporary Kings, a pensive duo session with saxist Mark Turner — found him thriving in an entirely different sonic space.)