Home

Lightnin’ Hopkins

Michael Ochs Archive/Getty

Sam "Lightnin'" Hopkins learned the blues from Blind Lemon
Jefferson in the Twenties. He was a ferocious electric stylist in
the Fifties, though he's perhaps best known for his nimble acoustic
fingerpicking during the Sixties folk-blues revival. As
unpredictable as John Lee Hooker, he seemed to be making it up as
he went along, and often was.

71

Lightnin’ Hopkins

Sam "Lightnin'" Hopkins learned the blues from Blind Lemon
Jefferson in the Twenties. He was a ferocious electric stylist in
the Fifties, though he's perhaps best known for his nimble acoustic
fingerpicking during the Sixties folk-blues revival. As
unpredictable as John Lee Hooker, he seemed to be making it up as
he went along, and often was.

70

Eddie Van Halen

The sound-obsessed Van Halen makes even simple lines sound like
towering chorales and pioneered all kinds of tricks, such as
fingers hammering the fretboard. Van Halen sought something
different from his rock peers: music that was defiantly arty, but
never so much so that it lost touch with devastating hooks.

69

Steve Howe

During an era when everyone wanted to be a bluesman, Howe brought
jazz, country, flamenco, ragtime and psychedelia into the mix for
prog — rockers Yes. The ringing harmonics that open
"Roundabout" may be Howe's best-known moment but Close to the Edge
shows his range, from acoustic delicacy to high-octane riffs.