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100 Greatest Country Songs of All Time

From “Blue Moon of Kentucky” to the Paisley croon of modern Nashville

100 Greatest Country Songs of All Time

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What makes a great country song? It tells a story. It draws a line. It has a twang you can feel down to the soles of your feet. Some get mad, some get weepy, some just get you down the road. But these are 100 essential songs that map out the story of country music, from Hank Williams howling at the moon to George Jones pouring one out for all the desperate lovers to Taylor Swift singing the suburban cowgirl blues.

Listen to Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Country Songs

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9. Dolly Parton, ‘Jolene’ (1973)

Inspired by the sight of her husband flirting with a bank teller, "Jolene" is Parton's most heartrending triumph and the most devastating cheating song of them all. These days, contemporary country charts are overloaded with blustery assertions of self-sufficiency – from Marina McBride to Miranda Lambert – which makes it even more heartbreaking to hear one of country's most beloved matriarchs sounding so vulnerable. "Jolene," a hit for Parton in 1973, sees her imploring another woman to leave her man alone. By Amanda Petrusich

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8. Merle Haggard, ‘Mama Tried’ (1968)

No one could write a prison number like ex-con Merle Haggard. Despite its humble origin as a commission for Killers Three, a B-movie produced by and starring Dick Clark, this 1968 Platonic ideal of a country song turned out to be the Hag's most autobiographical statement. With its James Burton dobro vamp and haiku-like Roy Nichols Fender solo, "Mama Tried" is a celebration of cussed stubbornness disguised as an apology. Haggard was indeed sent to San Quentin in 1957, but "instead of life in prison I was doing one-to-15 years," he told a reporter. "I just couldn't get that to rhyme." Oddly upbeat compared to his earlier "Sing Me Back Home," "Mama Tried" was adopted by perennial band-on-the-the-run the Grateful Dead, who performed it at Woodstock and on more than 300 subsequent occasions. By Richard Gehr

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7. Ray Charles, ‘You Don’t Know Me’ (1962)

This Cindy Walker-penned gem was pulled from about 250 country tunes Ray Charles considered for his 1962 album, Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music. Backed by a chorus and sumptuous strings, Charles constructs a lump in his throat and an ache in his heart while working his jazz and R&B expertise into "hillbilly" material. "[T]he words to country songs are very earthy like the blues, see, very down," he once told Rolling Stone. "Country songs and the blues is like it is." Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson all went on to cover what became a Number Two pop hit for Charles, but a somber version by Richard Manuel of the Band comes closest to reliving this version's woes. Modern Sounds galvanized racial integration in the music industry, made Nashville songwriters the hottest of the time, and showed Charles exercising artistic control unprecedented for black artists at the time. By Reed Fischer

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6. Tammy Wynette, ‘Stand By Your Man’ (1968)

A family-values tract with its share of contradictions (Wynette was a four-time divorcée). But there’s no mistaking the power in her voice or the beauty in Billy Sherrill’s lush production. Many heard her signature tune, written with producer Billy Sherrill, as a reactionary riposte to the then-emerging women’s liberation movement, rendering the song inextricable from the Baby Boomer culture wars. In 1992, Hillary Clinton even referred to it disparagingly when a 60 Minutes interview confronted her with questions about her husband’s infidelities. Wynette later said she spent 20 minutes writing this and 20 years defending it. By Keith Harris