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100 Greatest Country Songs of All Time

From “Blue Moon of Kentucky” to the Paisley croon of modern Nashville

100 Greatest Country Songs of All Time

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What makes a great country song? It tells a story. It draws a line. It has a twang you can feel down to the soles of your feet. Some get mad, some get weepy, some just get you down the road. But these are 100 essential songs that map out the story of country music, from Hank Williams howling at the moon to George Jones pouring one out for all the desperate lovers to Taylor Swift singing the suburban cowgirl blues.

Listen to Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Country Songs

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79. Garth Brooks, ‘The Dance’ (1989)

The second Number One single off Garth Brooks' debut LP, "The Dance" is a better-to-have-loved-and-lost slow jam that co-writer Tony Arata had been playing to open mic nights since he had moved to Nashville a few years earlier. "The only folks listening, however, were other songwriters," remembers Arata. When Brooks first heard him play "The Dance," he swore he would record the song if he ever got signed. By Linda Ryan

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78. Roger Miller, ‘King of the Road’ (1964)

Inspired by a sign in Chicago that read "Trailers for Sale or Rent," Roger Miller's finger-snapping, bass-walking 1965 hit sold 2.5 million copies and became the Texas-born songwriter's signature tune. Miller's deliciously detailed masterpiece describes a happy-go-lucky vagrant's existential tradeoff: "Two hours of pushin' a broom / Buys an eight-by-12 four-bit room." A perfectly modulated chorus sketches the hobo's sunny familiarity with train engineers' families before sneakily adding his similar acquaintance with "every door that ain't locked when no one's around." Later in '65, singer Jody Miller (no relation) answered with "Queen of the House," a similarly ironic ode to domestic royalty. Roger released his own sequel of sorts in 1970 when he opened Nashville's King of the Road Motor Inn. By Richard Gehr