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100 Greatest Bob Dylan Songs

From “Just Like a Woman” to “John Wesley Harding,” we count down the American icon’s key masterpieces

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EXCLUSIVE; SPECIAL RATES APPLY. Bob Dylan in his Greenwich Village apartment just a few months before he would release his self-titled debut album. (Ted Russell/Polaris) /// Bob Dylan

Ted Russell/Polaris

As Bob Dylan turns 75, he shows no signs of slowing down. The American icon is gearing up for a summer tour with longtime friend Mavis Staples and has just released Fallen Angels, his 37th LP and second straight Sinatra-inspired album of American Songbook classics. For generations to come, other artists will be turning to Dylan’s own catalog for inspiration. From the Sixties protest anthems that made him a star through to his noirish Nineties masterpieces and beyond, no other contemporary songwriter has produced such a vast and profound body of work: songs that feel at once awesomely ancient and fiercely modern. Here, with commentary from Bono, Mick Jagger, Lenny Kravitz, Lucinda Williams, Sheryl Crow and other famous fans, are Dylan’s 100 greatest songs – just the tip of the iceberg for an artist of his stature.

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EXCLUSIVE; SPECIAL RATES APPLY. Bob Dylan in his Greenwich Village apartment just a few months before he would release his self-titled debut album. (Ted Russell/Polaris) /// Bob Dylan

Ted Russell/Polaris

52

“Tears of Rage” (1975)

This mesmerizing ballad first came to the world's attention as the opening track on the Band's 1968 masterpiece, Music From Big Pink. There it is sung with agonizing grace by keyboardist Richard Manuel, who co-wrote the song with Dylan during the 1967 sessions at Big Pink. When The Basement Tapes officially came out in 1975, a version with Dylan singing lead came to light. Like so many of the songs Dylan wrote at Big Pink, "Tears of Rage" is elliptical, a string of casually surreal images that draw on the Bible and, in this case, Shakespeare's King Lear. Its tale of generational strife, tone of betrayal and opening reference to Independence Day suggest that the culture wars over Vietnam and civil rights were also on Dylan's mind. The song's repeated reminders that "life is brief" rise above cliché to a desperate moral calling, an insistence that, whatever our differences, our shared mortality must make for compassion.

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EXCLUSIVE; SPECIAL RATES APPLY. Bob Dylan in his Greenwich Village apartment just a few months before he would release his self-titled debut album. (Ted Russell/Polaris) /// Bob Dylan

Ted Russell/Polaris

51

“Things Have Changed” (2000)

In 2001, when Dylan accepted his one and only Oscar for this contribution to the Wonder Boys soundtrack, he thanked "the members of the Academy who were bold enough to give me this award for … a song that doesn't pussyfoot around nor turn a blind eye to human nature." That's one way of putting it: For all its offhand jokes ("gonna dress in draaag," he rasps at one point), "Things Have Changed" is one of the bitterest songs in Dylan's entire catalog. It's also a harsh riposte to many of his own earlier political songs, with their longing for social justice and societal progress; "I used to care," he sings with unmistakable intent. "But things have changed." As the title suggests, it's basically the evil twin of "The Times They Are A-Changin'."

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