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100 Best Debut Albums of All Time

From the Beatles to Nas and beyond

It was 50 years ago that the Beatles‘ released their first album, Please Please Me. In honor of that world-changing LP, we’ve compiled a list of the 100 Greatest Debut Albums of All Time. A note on how we made the list: Albums got docked points if the artist went on to far greater achievements (which is why Please, Please Me and Greetings from Asbury Park, great as they are, didn’t made the Top 10); conversely, we gave a little extra recognition to great debut albums that the artist never matched (hello, Is This It and Illmatic!). We also skipped solo debuts by artists who were already in well-known bands, which is why you won’t see John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band or Paul Simon. We focused, instead, on debuts that gave you the thrill of an act arriving fully-formed, ready to reinvent the world in its own image.

Devo, Are We Not Men
76

‘Are We Not Men? We Are Devo!’

Devo
Warner Brothers, 1978

Most bands try to go for a hot new sound on their debut album. Devo did them all one better with a hot new philosophy – impressing the gospel of societal "devolution" on a Seventies America that definitely needed to hear it. Billing themselves as "suburban robots here to entertain corporate life forms," they played tight, torrid music that contorted the assembly line pulse of their native Akron, Ohio on songs like "Jocko Homo," "Uncontrollable Urge" and a version of "Satisfaction" that stripped the Stones original down to its corroded chassis.

The Go-Gos, Beauty and the Beat
75

‘Beauty and the Beat’

The Go-Go's
A&M/I.R.S., 1981

The most popular girl group of the New Wave surfed to the top of the charts with this hooky debut. Everyone knows "We Got the Beat" and "Our Lips Our Sealed," exuberant songs that livened up the Top Forty, but the entire album welds punkish spirit to party-minded pop – from the L.A. anthem "This Town" to splashy power-pop like "Skidmarks on My Heart" and "Can't Stop The World." It's a beachscape of catty girls and pretty boys, and an image of Southern California that's just as indelible as anything by the Eagles or Doors.

The xx, xx
74

‘xx’

The xx
XL/Young Turks, 2009

Pop was in a maximalist phase, all pummeling Eurodance beats and rococo production flourishes, when these London indie rockers arrived with a radically different musical message: less can be much, much more. Songs like "Crystallized" and "Islands" are masterpieces of minimalism – songs built around simple chord progressions, delicate guitar and keyboard ostinatos, the gentle rub of Romy Madley-Croft and Oliver Sim's his-and-hers croons. It's beautiful music, an exercise in restraint, in the artful use of space and silence. It's also funky (check the bonus track cover of Aaliyah's "Hot Like Fire") and, against all odds, sexy – booty call music for the blog-rock set.

Norah Jones, Come Away with Me
73

‘Come Away with Me’

Norah Jones
Blue Note, 2002

Maybe the most surprising blockbuster of the 21st century, at 10 million-plus copies sold and counting, this sultry set made easy-listening music actually worth listening to. The magic is mainly in Jones' sexy, silky tone and effortless phrasing – it's not surprising her previous efforts included diva turns on downtempo EDM jams. But the song selection, including Hank Williams' "Cold Cold Heart" and Hoagy Carmichael's "The Nearness of You" alongside gems from a new generation of craftsmen, was also first-rate, while the arrangements balanced smoky jazz and soft pop without turning to abstraction or schmaltz. The result splits the difference between a languid kiss and a juicy bong hit.