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10 New Artists Defining the Sound of Now

Hear who’s next in punk, R&B and everything in between

2016, 2016 trends, car seat headrest, swmrs, wet band, anderson paak, giovanni james, chloe halle, frankie cosmos, flatbush zombies

Matthew James Wilson

With streaming and social media creating one of the biggest deluges of new artists in pop history, it's hard to stand out among the crowd. Still, budding musicians across genres are blurring lines, innovating sounds and reconfiguring what it means to break through in the industry. From feminist male punks like SWMRS to modernized retro-soul specialist Giovanni James and undefinable teenage-sister duo Chloe x Halle, here are 10 of the best emerging artists of the year.

The Next Wave; Rolling Stone; 2016, 2016 trends, car seat headrest, swmrs, wet band, anderson paak, giovanni james, chloe halle, frankie cosmos, flatbush zombies

Milan Zrnic

Wet

Synth-poppers turn quiet angst into an excellent album

Brooklyn has become a top exporter of great synth-pop bands in recent years. But Wet have set themselves apart with music that combines the elegant ache of Nineties R&B with the raw honesty of indie pop. "I feel like that's a very pure thing," singer Kelly Zutrau says. "When you can get as close as possible to a pure emotional intensity – that's when people hear something real in it." The songs on Wet's debut LP, Don't You, wring drama out of lyrics that often suggest snippets of actual relationship dialogue. Onstage, Zutrau delivers her confessional lyrics with an eyes-closed forcefulness that can be captivating and a little uncomfortable. The 28-year-old grew up a fan of Cat Power and TLC, dropping out of high school in Massachusetts to pursue art and music in New York, where she met multi-instrumentalists Joe Valle and Marty Sulkow. Wet released an EP in 2013 and pulled down opening gigs for Chvrches and Tobias Jesso Jr. For Don't You, the bandmates retreated to a house in western Massachusetts, where they wrote in a meditative isolation that comes through in their songs. Lately, Zutrau has been living in L.A. and writing with Rostam Batmanglij, formerly of Vampire Weekend."[Don't You] is about relationships," she says. "About managing ideas that are hard to deal with. It helped me process them." Hilary Hughes

Chloe x Halle; Flatbush Zombies; The Next Wave; Rolling Stone; 2016, 2016 trends, car seat headrest, swmrs, wet band, anderson paak, giovanni james, chloe halle, frankie cosmos, flatbush zombies

Max Papendieck

Chloe x Halle

Beyoncé's favorite YouTube stars break out on their own 

Sisters Chloe and Halle Bailey are only 17 and 16, respectively, but they have Michelle Obama as a fan, and they appeared on the video album for Beyoncé's Lemonade. "Magic was in the air in New Orleans," says Halle of their work in the clip for "Freedom." "We were saying, 'What a time to be alive.'" The sisters' music is just as impressive as their endorsers. Their EP Sugar Symphony – self-produced in their L.A. home – is an accomplished mix of R&B, jazz and alt-pop. "Our dad taught us to do everything on our own," Chloe says. "This industry is so dominated by men and older people," adds Halle. "You have to look into yourself and say, 'I can have wonderful ideas.'" B.S.

Flatbush Zombies; The Next Wave; Rolling Stone; 2016, 2016 trends, car seat headrest, swmrs, wet band, anderson paak, giovanni james, chloe halle, frankie cosmos, flatbush zombies

Courtesy of Flatbush Zombies

Flatbush Zombies

An acid-loving hip-hop crew takes on the dark side of reality

"Sometimes I like to take a trip real deep into my mind," says Meechy Darko of Brooklyn hip-hop trio Flatbush Zombies. "I travel back into my consciousness and face my demons." So far, that's worked out well for Flatbush Zombies, probably the first hip-hoppers to sell blotter paper alongside T-shirts at their concerts.

This year, their darkly psychedelic debut, 3001: A Laced Odyssey, hit Number One on Billboard's Independent Albums chart. "I wanted people to be like, 'Damn, this is like a movie trailer,'" says producer Erick "Arc" Elliott. "I wanted [the album] to take a journey that transcends into the darkness and gets happy again." The Zombies have been buddies since grade school, and all live in the same apartment complex. Elliott took up production years ago so he could entertain his mother after she lost her vision, and part of what makes 3001 stand out is the realism woven into its trippiness ("Fly Away" addresses a friend's suicide). "There's no downfall [in most rap songs]," says Meechy. "No one's getting anyone pregnant. Nobody's going broke. No two sides." It doesn't seem they'll be running short on inspiration. Says Meechy, "They say, 'Don't look into a mirror when you trip on acid.' That's my favorite thing to do." Jason Newman

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