Home Music Music Country Lists

40 Saddest Country Songs of All Time

Cry, Cry, Cry: From George Jones to Brad Paisley, the biggest weepers ever

George Jones and Brad Paisley

George Jones (1976) and Brad Paisley (2014).

Getty Images

Through the hillbilly music of the 1920s, the honky-tonk of the Forties and Fifties, the Bakersfield movement of the Sixties, bluegrass, Western swing, outlaw and contemporary pop, country songs still continue to break our hearts. Like no other musical genre, country stories of loss and heartbreak turn the old “tear in my beer” cliché into a sad, salty reality. So grab a few tissues and check out our list of the 40 saddest country songs ever written.

Johnny Cash saddest country songs
6

Johnny Cash, “Sunday Morning Coming Down”

From breakfast beer to dirty shirts, no song better describes the feeling of waking up hungover and alone than "Sunday Morning Coming Down." Kris Kristofferson wrote it from the depths of a condemned Music Row tenement soon after his wife had left and taken their daughter with her. "Sunday was the worst day of the week if you didn't have a family," Kristofferson told biographer John Morthland in 1991. "The bars were closed until 1 in the afternoon… so there was nothing to do all morning." Ray Stevens recorded "Sunday" first, but Cash's version — with all the pathos a phrase like "nothin' short of dyin' that's half as lonesome as the sound" deserves – was the one that made it to Number One. "Actually," Kristofferson told NPR last year, "it was the song that allowed me to quit working for a living."

John Michael Montgomery Saddest Country Songs
5

John Michael Montgomery, “The Little Girl”

A dysfunctional family's plight hits a disastrous final note in John Michael Montgomery's soap opera tale "The Little Girl." The last Billboard Hot Country Songs Number One of his career details a young girl hiding behind the couch while her drug-addled ma and alcoholic pa duke it out — with fatal results. Backed by harmonies from bluegrass stars Alison Krauss and Dan Tyminski and an arrangement to urge on the waterworks, Montgomery remains even-keeled as the fable reaches its spiritual conclusion.