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21 Most Unexpected Rockers to Go Country

From Steven Tyler’s new Nashville obsession to Tina Turner’s 1973 curveball

rockers gone country

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Steven Tyler is the latest rock god intoxicated by Nashville, releasing his country-flavored We're All Somebody From Somewhere solo album today — a project that stunned Aerosmith fans (and even bandmates). But jumping on the country bandwagon is nothing new. Just like Tyler, Tina Turner's very first solo album was country. Before her, Conway Twitty transitioned from hugely successful pop star to country music royalty. And some of Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bob Dylan's most memorable work was largely country-flavored. Here are our picks for the 21 rock, pop, R&B and rap acts with the most shocking (and, for the most part, successful) leaps to country.

NEW YORK - 1961: Bob Dylan performs at The Bitter End folk club in Greenwich Village

NEW YORK - 1961: Bob Dylan performs at The Bitter End folk club in Greenwich Village in 1961 in New York City, New York. (Photo by Sigmund Goode/Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images)

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Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan's early records always hinted at an appreciation for country music, but never as potently as John Wesley Harding and Nashville Skyline, two albums that doubled down on Tennessee twang and crisp, story-based songwriting. Dylan even adopted a new singing style for the occasion, filling Nashville Skyline with a gentle croon more suitable for a back-porch picking session than a rock & roll show. "Lay Lady Lay" remains timeless, but it's "Girl From the North Country" — his loose duet with Johnny Cash — that stands as Dylan's most countryfied moment to date. — A.L.

Listen: "Girl From the North Country"

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