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Review: ‘The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society’ (Super Deluxe Edition)

The band’s nostalgic classic gets reissued in a box full of extra goodies

The Kinks

The Kinks

Big Hassle Media

The Kinks’ quaint, baroque commercial bomb gets its due in a comprehensive box set that features every single track the band could dig up from the period: the album in stereo and mono (go with the mono), non-LP singles, outtakes, demos, BBC recordings, vintage interviews. The album was Ray Davies’ spry, personal love letter to postwar Britain at a time when old shops were being bulldozed in favor of ugly new buildings and people were switching from wooden kegs to metal ones for their draught beer. Songs like the existentially angsty “Animal Farm,” the wistful “Do You Remember Walter?” and the quirky “People Take Pictures of Each Other” are among the best Davies ever wrote. Although a lot of this material has come out over the years in various forms, the remastering sounds crisp and it’s great to have the album’s songs next to singles like “Days” and “Wonderboy,” as well as the upbeat radio recordings the band made. The physical box set adds all sorts of goodies, including a book with a tribute from the Who’s Pete Townshend in it. It’s an act of preservation worthy of the Kinks.

In This Article: Dave Davies, Ray Davies, The Kinks

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