Home Music Album Reviews

Review: Free Jazz Titan Peter Brotzmann Shows His Softer Side on ‘Sparrow Nights’

In a set of spare duets with pedal-steel radical Heather Leigh, the multi-reedist presents one of the moving statements of his 50-plus-year career

Heather Leigh and Peter Brotzmann

Veteran saxophonist Peter Brötzmann and pedal-steel radical Heather Leigh join up for a set of darkly poignant duets on 'Sparrow Nights.'

Frank Schindelbeck

Peter Brötzmann has spent more than 50 years repping the aggro fringe of free jazz. But the saxophonist behind famously abrasive Sixties sessions such as Machine Gun has always been a more nuanced player than his reputation as an air-raid-siren screamer would suggest. That’s why Sparrow Nights is a revelation. The 77-year-old German improviser has rarely sounded more vulnerable than he does on this set of atmospheric studio-recorded duets with American-born pedal-steel guitarist Heather Leigh, his frequent foil in recent years.

Many Brötzmann collaborators have engaged him in gladiator-style combat, as heard on another recent release from the saxist’s aptly named power trio Full Blast. Leigh instead emphasizes negative space. Set against her echoey, meditative swirls or harsh, pealing distortion (textures she combines with otherworldly vocals on a new solo album), Brötzmann — blowing hoarse laments or rough wails on a bevy of reeds, from bass sax to contra-alto clarinet and his customary tenor — often sounds like he’s interacting with the elements. The setting’s sparseness foregrounds the forlorn existential-blues pathos that’s been at the heart of his performances for decades. If Machine Gun was Brötzmann’s steely catharsis, Sparrow Nights is the haunted aftermath.

In This Article: Jazz

Show Comments

Newswire

Powered by
Close comments

Add a comment