The Who's 50 Greatest Songs

From power-pop anthems to operatic epics to stadium-size rockers and beyond

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6. "Baba O'Riley" ('Who's Next', 1971)

Spirituality, sonic adventurousness and the power (and failings) of rock & roll culture: All those concepts and themes converged in the epic track that opened Who's Next. The title is a nod to Townshend's guru Meher Baba and avant-garde composer Terry Riley. (The "O" was a sly wink to the jig-like section of the song driven by a fiddle.) Riley's influence was particularly felt in the keyboard that opens the song – an effects-driven organ played in a mesmerizing, repetitive pattern. One of many songs originally conceived for Townshend's aborted Lifehouse project, "Baba O'Riley" is, on one hand, about a character in the project – a "farmer, out in the fields," as Townshend has said. But the lyric also addressed the state of rock at the dawn of the Seventies: "the absolute desolation of teenagers after the second Isle of Wight festival, and after the Woodstock festival, where everybody was smacked out on acid and 20 people had brain damage," Townshend said. "People were already running toward the culture and its promise of salvation. But not everyone survived."

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