The 50 Greatest Concerts of the Last 50 Years

From Led Zeppelin's U.S. debut to Jay Z and Kanye West's 'Watch the Throne' spectacle, and beyond

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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 25th Anniversary Concert
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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 25th Anniversary Concert

The idea was to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with no less than the most important multi-artist concert in history. "I knew the anniversary had potency," said Hall of Fame Foundation chairman (and Rolling Stone founder) Jann Wenner. "I thought that we had earned the right and responsibility to do this thing. It was an opportunity not to be missed."

The organizers were determined to put on a show that was far more ambitious than any of the previous megashows, while capturing the intimate, collaborative spirit of the annual induction ceremonies and telling the story of rock & roll. "[I kept saying], 'If this is just miniconcerts of greatest hits, I'm bored,'" recalled co-producer Robbie Robertson. "'What do we have to offer that you can't get anywhere else?'"

The shows, held over two nights at New York's Madison Square Garden, were a rock fan's dream, with all the artists delivering blistering, unforgettable sets, no doubt inspired by the presence of so many of their peers and the event's grandeur. Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, who closed the first night, performed at their absolute peak, turning themselves into a soul revue as they backed Billy Joel, John Fogerty, Tom Morello and Darlene Love. U2 brought Springsteen back the next night, but the biggest moment came near the end of their set, when they kicked into "Gimme Shelter," and – out of nowhere – an unbilled Mick Jagger appeared onstage to the stunned delight of the crowd.

The first night began with a nod to rock's origins: Jerry Lee Lewis pounding out "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On." Next were Crosby, Stills and Nash (joined by Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and James Taylor), Stevie Wonder (with guests Smokey Robinson, John Legend, B.B. King, Sting and Jeff Beck) and a note-perfect Simon and Garfunkel. On the closing night, Aretha Franklin sang with Annie Lennox and Lenny Kravitz; Jeff Beck jammed with Buddy Guy, Billy Gibbons and Sting; and Metallica backed Ray Davies, Ozzy Osbourne and Lou Reed.

"For a lot of us here, rock & roll means just one word: liberation. Political, sexual, spiritual liberation," Bono said onstage, before Springsteen interrupted him with the other side of the equation: "Let's have some fun with it!" A.G.

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