The 100 Greatest Metal Albums of All Time

The most headbangable records ever, from Metallica's Black Album to Black Sabbath's 'Paranoid'

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Korn, 'Korn' (1994)
100
30/100

30. Korn, 'Korn' (1994)

Korn helped launch the nu-metal subgenre with their 1994 self-titled debut, unwittingly paving the way for bands like Deftones, System of a Down and Limp Bizkit. The band's seamless integration of beefy, bass-y metal riffs with rap rhythms and Jonathan Davis' experimental yelps, which sound like uncontrollable spasms of anger and disenfranchisement, spoke to a generation of metalheads that dug Nirvana and Tupac as much as Metallica. "We were trying to sound like a DJ had remixed our guitars," James "Munky" Shaffer explained in an interview with Rolling Stone. Lyrically, Davis tackles tough, personal subjects, like his addiction to amphetamines ("Blind") and his experiences being sexually abused as a child ("Daddy"). They didn't play the latter song live for two decades following the album's release due to the trauma attached to its creation and only brought it back when the band began to commemorate the LP's anniversary with live shows in 2014. The type of vulnerability Davis tackled head-on is what set Korn apart from the nu-metal spawns that followed their wake, though none of them ever quite tapped the same intensity as the songs on Korn. B.S.

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