The 100 Greatest Metal Albums of All Time

The most headbangable records ever, from Metallica's Black Album to Black Sabbath's 'Paranoid'

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Carcass, 'Heartwork' (1993)
100
51/100

51. Carcass, 'Heartwork' (1993)

Even now, it's hard to summarize the quantum leap forward that Heartwork represented for Carcass. Originally a pioneering grindcore trio from Liverpool, guitarist Bill Steer, bassist-vocalist Jeff Walker and drummer Ken Owen had made a splash with raw, writhing blurts like "Genital Grinder" and "Manifestation of Verrucose Urethra," featuring gruesome lyrics lifted from a medical dictionary. With the addition of second guitarist Michael Amott in 1990, Carcass grew more sleek and streamlined, and by 1993 complexity and gore had run their course. "On Heartwork – and this sounds embarrassing to say now – we took a stylistic cue from Metallica's "black" [album] and Nirvana's Nevermind," Walker told Decibel in 2013. "We tried to make the songs more straight to the point. … I'm not trying to say we were influenced [by] or tried to sound like those bands, but we definitely wanted to cut the crap." Factor in the band's interest in classic and contemporary hard rock, Steer and Amott's growing prowess with tightly wound riffs and freewheeling leads, a turn toward social commentary in Walker's lyrics, and Colin Richardson's stellar production, and what resulted was a collection of songs both uncompromising and instantly appealing – and an album that moved more than 80,000 units in a short-lived major label alliance with Columbia Records. S.S.

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