The 100 Greatest Metal Albums of All Time

The most headbangable records ever, from Metallica's Black Album to Black Sabbath's 'Paranoid'

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Black Sabbath, 'Master of Reality' (1971)
100
34/100

34. Black Sabbath, 'Master of Reality' (1971)

After recording what was more or less their live sets in the studio for their first two records, Black Sabbath faced a unique challenge on Master of Reality: actually writing an album. As with the LP's predecessors, they teamed with producer Rodger Bain, who encouraged them to create a sound that was both nuanced and direct. Drummer Bill Ward played a timbale on the pulsating "Children of the Grave," and the song was much funkier because of it. Meanwhile, guitarist Tony Iommi toyed around with noise on the outro of that song, flute on the ballad "Solitude" and synths on "After Forever" (which incidentally may be the first Christian metal tune, courtesy of chief lyricist, bassist Geezer Butler). He also tuned his guitar down on some songs to make it easier on his digits, some of which lacked fingertips after an industrial accident early in his adult life, leading to one of metal's heaviest-ever riffs on "Into the Void." But he still managed to make a classic in standard tuning: "Sweet Leaf," the premier stoner-metal anthem, which features Ozzy Osbourne singing "Come on now, try it out" and begins with the sound of Iommi hacking up a lung while smoking a joint before giving way to a riff so massive it sounds as if it's collapsing on itself. "I was outside recording an acoustic thing, and Ozzy brought me a joint," Iommi once said. "I had a puff and nearly choked myself, and they were taping it." Peer pressure never sounded so heavy. K.G.

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