Eagles' Complete Discography: Don Henley Looks Back

Triumph, heartache and a little bit of peyote: The stories behind every studio album, in his own words

'Long Road Out of Eden,' 2007
7
1/7

'Long Road Out of Eden,' 2007

After their acrimonious breakup and hugely successful Nineties reunions, the Eagles finally got down to making their long-awaited comeback LP. With complete artistic control, it ended up being a double album full of politics and introspection.

What was your vision of how you wanted the Eagles to sound in the new century? What did you want people to take away from an Eagles album that they hadn't before?
We agonized for a while about whether we should make a deliberate effort to "modernize" our sound, but ultimately decided that we should just make music that reflected who and where we were at that particular point in time. That's what we'd always done, so there was no reason to do anything that might seem forced or contrived. We had grown some, both as musicians and as people – we'd made solo records, started families. So rather than try to go back in time or try to be flagrantly "progressive," we just wanted to be ourselves. I think there is some really good material on that album, some songwriting and playing that rivaled anything we'd done previously.

Did you meet with any producers before you began, or did you decide to do it yourself from the start?
We actually began the recording of the Long Road Out of Eden album with our former producer Bill Szymczyk at the helm. I saw his function as more of a mediator, a consigliere, a ringmaster, if you will. Glenn and I, by that time, had learned how to produce records. In fact, everybody in the band knew what to do, and once we got into the process, it turned out that we didn't really need an overseer. We worked in rotating teams in two different studios, mine and Glenn's. That enabled us to work on more than one song at a time, and it expedited the process.

When you and Glenn started writing songs for this album, what did you discover that you still shared, in terms of approaches to melody or lyrics?
We had both become more adept at the process of songwriting, more comfortable and confident as writers. Melody and lyrics were just as important – maybe more so – than ever. But there wasn't as much flailing around, trying to find a direction, not as much doubt. Again, we had the luxury of time; we did a lot of touring during the making of that album. To this day, I still think it should have been a single album, but in order to give every member the space he needed and still maintain sound quality (fidelity), it became necessary to make it a double-disc package.

What inspired a biting song like "Business as Usual"?
The collective unconsciousness of the general populace; how we scurry along, ant-like, in our little ruts, day after day, completely oblivious to – or apathetic about – the bigger picture. How naive we are about the inner workings and the destructive forces of big business and politics, the irreversible damage that's being done to the planet and so many of its voiceless inhabitants. The middle class is disappearing and with it the "middle ground" – the little island of reason and moderation that bobs between the monoliths of extremist ideologies that are rampant in our country today.

A portion of the song is also a reference to the legal profession, the utter ruthlessness of it. It seems that some of the biggest pricks in the profession, the most contemptible, soulless scumbags to ever "practice" law have offices in Century City. They will, I'm sure, take that as a compliment.

In which ways was the record-making process different than it was in the past?
It was certainly different in terms of technology, although with each member having made solo albums during the 14-year hiatus, we were all fairly familiar with all the new electronics. The difference was that we had never used that technology in the context of the Eagles. But it worked out fine. Other elements of the process, including some of the negative aspects, remained exactly the same as ever.

Looking back on Long Road Out of Eden, almost a decade later, what does it add to the group's legacy now that it is, unfortunately, the group's last studio album?
Well, it adds a certain poignancy, doesn't it? In looking back at it now, that album contains several songs of foreboding and farewell: "No More Walks in the Wood," "I Don't Want to Hear Any More," "You Are Not Alone," "Long Road Out of Eden," "Last Good Time in Town," "Center of the Universe," and the eerily prescient "It's Your World Now," Glenn's beautiful philosophical valediction to his wife and kids. It's almost as if we knew that record would be our last. But our fans have been wonderful. They've been loyal to the end, and sadly, this is the end. But what a ride. ... what a crazy, wonderful ride.

Back to Top