50 Greatest Pop-Punk Albums

From Blink-182 to the Buzzcocks, we count down the best of punk's most lovable, lovelorn offshoot

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Generation X, 'Generation X' (1978)
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7. Generation X, 'Generation X' (1978)

Though he made his biggest commercial mark in the Eighties, some of Billy Idol's finest work can be found on the self-titled 1978 debut of London punks Generation X. Packed with zippy chord progressions, instantly catchy choruses and gobs of streetwise attitude – the patented Idol sneer was already in full effect – songs like "Ready Steady Go," "Youth Youth Youth," "One Hundred Punks" and the dramatic "Kiss Me Deadly" were generally considered too poppy and shallow to be taken seriously at the time, but they've aged remarkably well. "We were trying to communicate our experiences in a romantic but still realistic way, instead of just shouting grievances, as was the fashion at the time," Idol wrote in his 2015 autobiography, Dancing With Myself. "This new direction pulled us away from the old punk, allowing us to maintain its aggression and attitude while advancing musically by exploring other, more complicated emotions and feelings." The approach also left its mark on numerous pop-punk practitioners to come; as Billie Joe Armstrong put it back in 1994, when Rolling Stone asked him about being an icon for twentysomethings, "The only thing I know about Generation X is that I really liked their first record a lot." D.E.

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