40 Albums Baby Boomers Loved That Millennials Don't Know

From Tina Turner to Eric Clapton, these LPs were beloved by millions, but are younger generations finding them?

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The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, 'The Paul Butterfield Blues Band' (1965)
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Courtesy of Elektra Records40/40

The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, 'The Paul Butterfield Blues Band' (1965)

While acts like the Rolling Stones and Yardbirds were reworking traditional blues into rock across the pond, the multi-racial Paul Butterfield Blues Band came along as one of the States' best young acts in the genre. Based out of Chicago, the lineup included Butterfield on vocals and harmonica, as well as the legendary twin-guitar attack of Elvin Bishop and Mike Bloomfield, who built upon the sounds of Elmore James and Muddy Waters, whose songs they covered on their exciting 1965 self-titled debut. The album and their impressive live performances led Bob Dylan to draft Bloomfield for "Like a Rolling Stone," as well as his bandmates bassist Jerome Arnold and drummer Sam Lay, for his controversial electric performance at the '65 Newport Folk Festival. The band later expanded its repertoire into jazz and fusion, a nascent genre in the late Sixties, while somehow getting less credit than their English counterparts. Regardless, the blues has long since been relegated to its own stylistic niche. 

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