30 Fascinating Early Bands of Future Music Legends

From Billy Joel's heavy-metal duo to Madonna's post-punk act and Neil Young's Motown outfit, these are the primordial groups that rock forgot

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Lemmy's Costumed Sixties Band the Rockin' Vickers

Lemmy Kilmister may not seem like man of the cloth, but the Motörhead frontman spent much of the Sixties donning a priest's collar as a member of the Rockin' Vickers. "My old man would have hated it, seeing me in a band that – shock, horror – took the piss out of being a vicar," he later told author Mick Wall. "At the same time he'd probably have loved seeing me having to wear a fucking vicar's dog collar onstage." His interest in rock & roll began young – he once hitchhiked to Liverpool at age 16 to catch one of the Beatles' Cavern sets – and his tenure in low-profile Manchester bands like the Rainmakers and then the Motown Sect prepared him well for his invitation to join the comparatively professional Vickers in 1965. Initially a covers band working the cabaret circuit along the Blackpool pier, they had released a single, "I Go Ape," which met with scattershot success on the European mainland.

"He was a fan of our band before joining forces with our two road managers and setting our gear up for us," bandmate Harry Feeney told Wall. "We didn't pay him a wage, we just fed him and kept him. Then the band had a big bust-up and we were left with only three of us. Lemmy turned round and said, 'I can do this,' and he got onstage and he was brilliant." The group played to 10,000-seat arenas in Finland and, according the legend, were the first rock band to break through the Iron Curtain following an offer to play Yugoslavia as part of a cultural exchange program.

The band secured a recording contract with producer Shel Talmy, famous for working with the Who and the Kinks (plus a young David Bowie). Perhaps because of this, the Rockin' Vickers' next two singles owed a serious debt to the two bands. "It's Alright" was such a blatant steal of the Who's "The Kids Are Alright" that Pete Townshend apparently threatened to sue (though Lemmy says the Who became "great mates" during his Motörhead days), and their follow up single was a cover of Ray Davies' "Dandy." It didn't chart in their native country, but Lemmy insisted they were living large from live bookings. "We didn't have hit records but you didn't need 'em. We were making, in those days, quite a lot of money. We had this big house we lived in and three fucking Jaguars and a speedboat on Lake Windermere. We used to go water-skiing. That was the heyday, if you ask me."

By 1967 Lemmy decided wanted to get a piece of the London action and subsequently quit the band. He shared a room with Noel Redding, and briefly served as a roadie for Jimi Hendrix, but within a few years he'd be topping the bill himself – first in the psych rock band Sam Gopal, then Hawkwind and finally Motörhead. 

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