30 Fascinating Early Bands of Future Music Legends

From Billy Joel's heavy-metal duo to Madonna's post-punk act and Neil Young's Motown outfit, these are the primordial groups that rock forgot

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Bon Scott's Australian Teen-Pop Band the Valentines

AC/DC's manager Michael Browning once described the Valentines as "a satin-clad, bell-bottom–wearing teeny-bop band." In other words, not the kind of group in which you'd expect to find Bon Scott. But the future metal god spent the late Sixties as a co-frontman of the Perth-based pop group, sharing the spotlight with singer Vince Lovegrove. Formed in 1966, the Valentines were a fusion of Scott's first band, the Spektors, and Lovegrove's the Winstons. Scoring their first local chart entry with a cover of Arthur Alexander's "Every Day I Have to Cry," the band capitalized on their success by recording a number of songs co-written by George Young and Henry Vanda – previously members of the Aussie rock outfit the Easybeats and future AC/DC producers.

Moving to Melbourne by the end of 1967 to pursue national fame, the group became an in-demand act on the touring circuit, drawing hoards of teenage girls eager to get a look at the twin heartthrobs out front. Even at this early stage, Scott was not suited to the life of a teen idol. His friend, former AC/DC bassist Mark Evans, recalled seeing the uneasy truce between Bon Scott the Rock Outlaw and Bon Scott the Pop Star in his book, Dirty Deeds: My Life Inside/Outside AC/DC. "I was sitting in front of the PA on the side of the stage and I could see him disappear into the wings during solos and after songs to slug from a bottle of Johnnie Walker," he writes. "As the set progressed he built up a descent sweat and I could see something strange going on under the sheer chiffon sleeves. Tattoos were starting to appear – he had tried to hide them with makeup but the sweat was making it run. The guy was turning into Bon Scott before my eyes."

As tastes shifted from lightweight pop towards heavier rock cuts by the end of the decade, the Valentines struggled to shed their image and their popularity waned. They promoted their 1968 single "Peculiar Hole in the Sky" with an advertisement bearing the comically desperate copy: "Please buy a copy – we're starving." It was barely a joke, as the group had taken to sneaking bites in the middle of supermarket aisles while on tour. "We were very poor, almost starving, driving down the highways, absorbed with rock 'n' roll, stealing people's front door milk money ... living on boiled potatoes, the dreams of success our mantra," Lovegrove later wrote of those difficult days. "[But] when he sang, Bon took off into charisma-land."

Their circumstances deteriorated further on September 20th, 1969, when authorities raided the group's lodgings at the Jan Juc Surf Life Saving Club and discovered marijuana. The legal repercussions of this, the first major rock & roll drug bust in Australian history, exacerbated personality clashes within the band. "Bon and I have often come really close to punching the shit out of each other," Lovegrove told Go-Set that same year. Even worse, the music wasn't selling. The failure of their February 1970 single, "Juliette," sealed the band's fate. 

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