20 Albums Rolling Stone Loved in the Sixties That You've Never Heard

We praised them 45 years ago — and you should listen to them today!

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The Insect Trust, 'The Insect Trust'
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Ascension Records2/20

The Insect Trust, 'The Insect Trust'

This freak-folk group took its name from William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch and featured John Fahey protégé Bill Barth, Greenwich Village folk mainstay Luke Faust and clarinetist Robert Palmer (best known as a future Rolling Stone contributor). The group only stuck together for two albums before dispersing, but the Insect Trust didn't just sound good in the late Sixties: The reissue of their sophomore LP Hoboken Saturday Night earned four stars in a David Fricke-penned 2005 review, adding that bands like the Insect Trust inspired rock critic Greil Marcus to create the phrase "old weird America." Faust was later praised in a passage in Bob Dylan's Chronicles. Palmer passed in 2007, but an anthology of his writing, Blues & Chaos: The Music Writing of Robert Palmer, was released in 2009.

What We Said Then: "The Insect Trust isn't even a group, at least not in any traditional sense of the word… The lineup of personnel seems to have changed month by month. Whatever all of these factors might mean is hard to say, but, at the least on this record, this bunch of people has captured something truly distinctive and vital. They could hardly avoid it, with a lineup of talent like they have." By Edmund O. Ward, March 1st, 1969

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