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Drawn Out: The 50 Best Non-Superhero Graphic Novels

Disaffected hipsters, cyberpunk dystopias, cranky ducks and boy geniuses: here are the greatest comic-story collections that don’t feature caped crusaders

Summer has become the de facto season of the superhero movies, and while some of us still love a good guy-in-a-cape-fights-for-truth-justice-etc. comic book, some counterprogramming is in order. Here are 50 outstanding comics — graphic novels of literary fiction, journalism, sci-fi, fantasy, the works — that do not contain superheroes whatsoever.

How Spider-Man Conquered the World

Note: No daily or weekly newspaper strips were included here, so apologies to outstanding works like Peanuts, Doonesbury, Calvin and Hobbes, Dick Tracy, Life in Hell, anything by Saul Steinberg, and Krazy Kat (still the Beatles of newspaper comics). Also, fanpersons, we're aware that chances are your favorite title is not on here; you'll undoubtledly hate the ranking order; and you'll find some selections idiosyncratic at best and outrageous at worst. But since those of us who love comics also love nothing more than complaining about comics, you're welcome. By Joe Gross

Courtesy Top Shelf Comix

6

‘From Hell,’ Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell

Yes, Watchmen is the first and last word on superhero revisionism (even if mainstream comics learned all the wrong lessons from it), V for Vendetta is one of the great riffs on Thatcherism and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is the 19th century pulp-reference version of a Pynchon novel. But Moore, one of the great fiction minds of his generation, never accomplished anything as dense or as satisfying as this — his massive, footnoted take on Jack the Ripper and the bloody birth of the 20th century. Both creators are at the top of their game: Campbell's grubby lines are the perfect evocation of the horror of everyday Victorian life in the underclasses, while Moore's allegorical plotting — looping in the Royal family, Masonic occult ritual, the Elephant Man and the nature of London itself — makes for a hypnotic read and perpetual re-read.

Courtesy Robert Crumb

5

‘The Complete Robert Crumb,’ Robert Crumb

Are the sexual and racial politics sketchy of the man behind Fritz the Cat and that notorious Mr. Natural strip involving a headless woman dodgy as hell? No question about it. But, for 50 years, any cartoonist dealing with autobiography, the intricacies of their id or satire of almost any kind has HAD to contend with Crumb's extraordinary, ground-breaking work. Hell, other cartoonists even ape the guys affectations (78s obsessiveness, thrift store suits). To ignore him completely is only to invite accidentally ripping him off; he's the Bob Dylan of the comics underground, and his work is embedded in the medium's DNA now.

Courtesy Alison Bechdel

4

‘Fun Home,’ Alison Bechdel

In this stunningly intimate book, noted lesbian cartoonist Bechdel (who also wrote the seminal comic strip "Dykes to Watch Out For") pens a complex, compassionate, moving graphic novel about her father's closeted gay life, his possible suicide and the reverberations in her family. Her follow-up, 2012's "Are You My Mother: A Comic Drama" is nearly as excellent, and she's also invented (or at least named) the "Bechdel Test" for entertainment: Does a work features 1.) at least two women who 2.) who talk to each other 3.) about something other than a man? You'd be surprised how few movies, TV shows, books etc. do not pass the test. Actually, no, you wouldn't be.

Courtesy Knopf

3

‘Maus,’ Art Spiegelman

Art Spiegleman had been serializing the extraordinary story of his father's time in Auschwitz in his art-comix magazine Raw since 1980, with mice standing in for Jews and cats for Nazis. After some revisions, Pantheon published the game-chaing first half in 1986, popularizing the term "graphic novel" in the process. (A sequel, a partial reflection on the success of the first half, arrived in 1991.) The language barely existed to honor such a creation, yet that didn't stop Spiegelman's anthropomorphic story of wartime atrocities from winning a special Pulitzer in 1992. It's the single best comic of a year that also produced Alan Moore's Watchmen and Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns, which is saying something.

Courtesy Knopf

2

‘Jimmy Corrigan, The Smartest Boy on Earth,’ Chris Ware

The graphic novel that really started the "No, seriously, maybe this stuff is worthy of, say, an American Book Award and the Guardian First Book Award." Along with Dan Clowes, Ware practically owned the Nineties when it came to alt-comics largely thanks to this story, first serialized in the Chicago paper New City. The writer-artist turned his hyper-detailed, delicately designed style into the story of a very lonely middle-aged man who meets his father for the first time, intercutting the familial repetition-of-tragedy-through-generations of the family and stretching the narrative back to the Civil War and the 1893 Chicago Exposition — settings that beautifully complement Ware's ragtimey design style. It's easily the emotional equal of anything by Dave Eggers (a devout fan) or Zadie Smith.

Courtesy Fantagraphics

1

‘Love and Rockets,’ Los Bros Hernandez

Imagine the Clash or R.E.M. or Run-DMC not only never broke up, but, for 30 years, never once released a less-than-excellent record. Imagine their command of their craft just became more pronounced year after year, earning the unshakable admiration of their fans and peers. Imagine they made the best record of their career, 30 years on, this decade. This is essentially what Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez have done with Love and Rockets, the greatest American comic book series of all time. Hell, between Jaime's "Locas" storyline on aging punks (probably the best piece of fiction about punk ever created) and Gilbert's "Luba," a semi-magical-realist epic about several generations of a Central American family, they are two of the most important contemporary Latino writers of their generation. Not to mention that Jaime's recently collected storyline, "The Love Bunglers," is a stone-cold masterpiece. Their entire body of work is as essential as anything by, well, the Clash or R.E.M. or Run-DMC.

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